The Cat who Came for Christmas

Front Cover
Little, Brown, 1987 - Humor - 240 pages
15 Reviews
'Twas the night before Christmas when a bedraggled white feline enters the heart--and home--of Cleveland Amory. To say it is a friendly takeover is an understatement. For the cat who came for Christmas is clearly of the Independent Type, and Cleveland Amory, curmudgeon or not, is, where animals are concerned, a pushover.Toe to toe they stand--Amory at six feet three, the cat at six inches--and eyeball to eyeball with each other on every issue: whether or not to come when called; to recognize one's name; to take a trip, a pill, a bath, or a walk on a leash; to be civil to New People; or even in an age when Thin Is In, why anyone in his right mind would want to be the Last Fat Cat. We will not spoil The Cat Who Came For Christmas by telling you who blinks first. Suffice it to say that in this hilarious battle, nine times out of ten, it is not the cat.

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
1
4 stars
6
3 stars
5
2 stars
2
1 star
1

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - phredfrancis - LibraryThing

I read this based on a recommendation, and while it was enjoyable, it convinced me that, really, cats are only interesting to their owners. I like cats. I do not like books about cats. Although ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - fuzzi - LibraryThing

I started reading this book, expecting to thoroughly love it. After reading several chapters, I put it down. I'm not sure why, but I did not enjoy this book. Perhaps I was expecting something of the ... Read full review

References to this book

About the author (1987)

Cleveland Amory is a humorist and humanitarian especially known for his books about animals and his animal advocacy. Amory was born in 1917 into a prominent New England family. Amory attended Harvard where he was president of the Harvard Crimson. Upon graduation, Amory became the youngest editor ever of The Saturday Evening Post. He served in Army Intelligence in World War II and soon after the war wrote a trilogy of social history studies, including The Proper Bostonians, which is still in print 50 years later. He also wrote The Last Resorts and Who Killed Society? Amory was social commentator of the Today Show and chief critic of the TV Guide from 1963 to 1976. He wrote a weekly column for the Saturday Review and delivered a daily radio essay titled Curmudgeon at Large. Amory became senior contributing editor of Parade magazine in 1980. In 1974 he wrote Man Kind? Our Incredible War on Wildlife, one of a few books ever to be awarded an editorial in The New York Times. This book inspired The Guns of Autumn, a CBS documentary on hunting. His books on cats include The Cat Who Came for Christmas, The Cat and the Curmudgeon, and The Best Cat Ever. In 1996 an anthology, Cat Tales: Classic Stories from Favorite Writers, joined his other cat books. Ranch of Dreams, published in 1997, tells the story of Black Beauty Ranch, a sanctuary and shelter for animals developed in East Texas by the Fund for Animals, which Amory founded in 1967. Amory lives in New York. He visits Black Beauty Ranch often and continues to be active on behalf of animals.

Bibliographic information