The Alpine Yeoman: An Emma Lord Mystery

Front Cover
Random House Publishing Group, 2014 - Fiction - 336 pages
20 Reviews
Mary Daheim's bestselling novels, set in Alpine, a picturesque village tucked away in the Cascade Mountains, have charmed a generation of mystery lovers with suspenseful tales of the peril that bubbles up from below the serene surface of small-town life.
 
An ill wind blows through Alpine, but Advocate publisher Emma Lord and Sheriff Milo Dodge seem immune to the prevailing angst. The newlyweds' domestic idyll is most definitely over when a dead man is discovered near the fish hatchery and nobody has a clue as to his identity. Vida Runkel may have insight, but Emma's redoubtable House & Home editor is mad at the world and saying little. Moreover, whispers of scandal travel through the quaint streets when some high school girls mysteriously take a walk on the wild side. And then Milo's dedicated deputy, Sam Heppner, a true yeoman, suddenly goes AWOL.
 
What's happening in Alpine? If Milo knows, he's not telling Emma. And Emma's again headed for trouble when she starts snooping. The situation grows even more fraught when a shocking link is revealed between the mystery corpse and one of Alpine's own, unearthing a long-buried dark secret. Tongues are wagging on Front Street--and the gossip contains an air of menace. Meanwhile, Mary Daheim has written her best book yet.

Praise for The Alpine Yeoman
 
"Daheim injects enough wit and color to make her tale more entertaining than the standard small-town mystery."--Kirkus Reviews
 
"A core of familiar characters adds charm to all Daheim's 'alphabet' stories. Readers will find this new one similarly enjoyable."--Fredericksburg Free Lance-Star
 
"A witty and wonderful story that will keep readers glued to the pages . . . This author should be given a pat on the back considering this is the twenty-fifth novel in the Emma Lord series . . . and each one just keeps getting better and better!"--Suspense Magazine

"This is the twenty-fifth Alpine mystery and Mary Daheim continues to delight readers with new twists and a wonderful and ever-evolving cast of eccentric characters. Highly recommended."--I Love a Mystery

Praise for Mary Daheim and her Emma Lord mysteries
 
"Always entertaining."--The Seattle Times
 
"Mary Daheim writes with wit, wisdom, and a big heart. I love her books."--Carolyn Hart
 
"Daheim writes . . . with dry wit, a butter-smooth style, and obvious wicked enjoyment."--The Oregonian
 
"The characters are great, and the plots always attention-getting."--King Features Syndicate
 
"Even the most seasoned mystery fans are caught off-guard by [Daheim's] clever plot twists."--BookLoons
 
"Witty one-liners and amusing characterizations."--Publishers Weekly

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Review: The Alpine Yeoman (Emma Lord Mystery #25)

User Review  - Gloria Schwarting - Goodreads

Tried to write a review of this earlier but it wouldn't come up on the search. Guess it was too new then. It was OK but most of the drama came outside of the actual murder. Read full review

Review: The Alpine Yeoman (Emma Lord Mystery #25)

User Review  - Joanna - Goodreads

I somehow missed this one when it was released. I am a fan of the Alpine series and liked this one better than some. Glad to see Emma and Milo settling into their relationship as spouses. Makes wonder how this will all end in "Z". Read full review

About the author (2014)

Mary Richardson Daheim started spinning stories before she could spell. Daheim has been a journalist, an editor, a public relations consultant, and a freelance writer, but fiction was always her medium of choice. In 1982, she launched a career that is now distinguished by sixty novels. In 2000, she won the Literary Achievement Award from the Pacific Northwest Writers Association. In October 2008, she was inducted into the University of Washington's Communication Alumni Hall of Fame. Daheim lives in her hometown of Seattle and is a direct descendant of former residents of the real Alpine, which existed as a logging town from 1910 to 1929, when it was abandoned after the mill was closed. The Alpine/Emma Lord series has created interest in the site, which was named a Washington State ghost town in July 2011. An organization called the Alpine Advocates has been formed to preserve what remains of the town as a historic site.

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