Samurai William: The Englishman who Opened Japan

Front Cover
Macmillan, 2002 - Biography & Autobiography - 352 pages
34 Reviews
02 An eye-opening account of the first encounter between England and Japan, by the acclaimed author of Nathaniel's Nutmeg

In 1611, the merchants of London's East India Company received a mysterious letter from Japan, written several years previously by a marooned English mariner named William Adams. Foreigners had been denied access to Japan for centuries, yet Adams had been living in this unknown land for years. He had risen to the highest levels in the ruling shogun's court, taken a Japanese name, and was now offering his services as adviser and interpreter.

Seven adventurers were sent to Japan with orders to find and befriend Adams, in the belief that he held the key to exploiting the opulent riches of this forbidden land. Their arrival was to prove a momentous event in the history of Japan and the shogun suddenly found himself facing a stark choice: to expel the foreigners and continue with his policy of isolation, or to open his country to the world. For more than a decade the English, helped by Adams, were to attempt trade with the shogun, but confounded by a culture so different from their own, and hounded by scheming Jesuit monks and fearsome Dutch assassins, they found themselves in a desperate battle for their lives.

Samurai William is the fascinating story of a clash of two cultures, and of the enormous impact one Westerner had on the opening of the East.
An eye-opening account of the first encounter between England and Japan, by the acclaimed author of Nathaniel's Nutmeg

In 1611, the merchants of London's East India Company received a mysterious letter from Japan, written several years previously by a marooned English mariner named William Adams. Foreigners had been denied access to Japan for centuries, yet Adams had been living in this unknown land for years. He had risen to the highest levels in the ruling shogun's court, taken a Japanese name, and was now offering his services as adviser and interpreter.

Seven adventurers were sent to Japan with orders to find and befriend Adams, in the belief that he held the key to exploiting the opulent riches of this forbidden land. Their arrival was to prove a momentous event in the history of Japan and the shogun suddenly found himself facing a stark choice: to expel the foreigners and continue with his policy of isolation, or to open his country to the world. For more than a decade the English, helped by Adams, were to attempt trade with the shogun, but confounded by a culture so different from their own, and hounded by scheming Jesuit monks and fearsome Dutch assassins, they found themselves in a desperate battle for their lives.

Samurai William is the fascinating story of a clash of two cultures, and of the enormous impact one Westerner had on the opening of the East.
  

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Review: Samurai William: The Englishman Who Opened Japan

User Review  - Gillian - Goodreads

Enjoyed for the historical content. Milton writes so well. Read full review

Review: Samurai William: The Englishman Who Opened Japan

User Review  - The Idiot - Goodreads

Fun popular history of a little known story. Giles is still a cock though. Read full review

Contents

PROLOGUE
3
1 AT THE COURT OF BUNGO
9
2 ICEBERGS IN THE ORIENT
32
3 ALL AT SEA
56
4 IN THE NAME OF THE FATHER
83
5 SAMURAI WILLIAM
109
6 INTO UNKNOWN LANDS
132
7 GREETING MR ADAMS
155
9 CLASH OF THE SAMURAI
208
10 A QUESTION OF LANGUAGE
237
11 KILLED LIKE FISHES
265
12 A RUPTURED FRIENDSHIP
281
13 LAST ORDERS
302
NOTES AND SOURCES
327
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
339
INDEX
341

8 AT HOME WITH RICHARD COCKS
183

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2002)

Giles Milton is the author of Nathaniel's Nutmeg (FSG, 1999), Big Chief Elizabeth (FSG, 2000) and The Riddle and the Knight (FSG, 2001). He lives in London.

Bibliographic information