Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

Front Cover
Signet Classics, 2012 - Fiction - 144 pages
45 Reviews
"Why did you wake me? I was dreaming a fine bogey tale."   Robert Louis Stevenson's masterpiece of the duality of good and evil in man's nature sprang from the darkest recesses of his own unconscious--during a nightmare from which his wife awakened him, alerted by his screams. More than a hundred years later, this tale of the mild-mannered Dr. Jekyll and the drug that unleashes his evil, inner persona--the loathsome, twisted Mr. Hyde--has lost none of its ability to shock. Its realistic police-style narrative chillingly relates Jekyll's desperation as Hyde gains control of his soul--and gives voice to our own fears of the violence and evil within us. Written before Freud's naming of the ego and the id, Stevenson's enduring classic demonstrates a remarkable understanding of the personality's inner conflicts--and remains the irresistibly terrifying stuff of our worst nightmares.   Includes the Famous Cornell Lecture on Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Vladimir Nabokov   With a New Introduction by Kelly HUrley and with an Afterword by Dan Chaon

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - capiam1234 - LibraryThing

Not as bad as Tom Sawyer Abroad, but no where near as great as the 1st two. It felt rushed and not thought out well. I did enjoy Tom's discovery of the murderers at the end though. Read full review

Review: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

User Review  - Kelsey - Goodreads

Classic. No doubt about it. The plot idea is unbelievably imaginative and dark. The language can be challenging at times, but it's definitely worth the extra work and time to understand and make sense of it. One of my favourite pieces of literature. Top notch. Read full review

About the author (2012)

Robert Louis Stevenson, novelist, poet, and essayist, was born in Edinburgh on November 13, 1850. Ill health interrupted his formal education at Edinburgh University and plagued him throughout his life. Leading a bohemian existence during his twenties and thirties, his travels throughout Europe formed the basis of his first two books,An Inland Voyage (1878) and Travels With a Donkey (1879). In 1875 he settled into the artists colony at Barbizon and began writing for English magazines. There he met Fanny Van de Grift Osbourne, a married woman ten years his senior, with whom he fell in love. In 1879 he followed her to San Francisco (which gave rise to An Amateur Emigrant). After she obtained a divorce, they married and for the next eight years traveled a great deal in Europe and America in search of good health. Stevenson remained industrious and during this period wroteTreasure Island (1883), his first popular success. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde andKidnapped appeared in 1886, followed by The Black Arrow in 1888. The Stevensons finally settled in Samoa, where he became involved in politics and was known as Tusitala, the Teller of Tales. He was dictatingWeir of Hermiston on December 3, 1894, the day he died of a cerebral hemorrhage.

Vladimir Nabokov was born in 1899 in St. Petersburg, Russia to a trilingual household; he could read and write in English before Russian or French. The family went into exile after the Bolshevik revolution, living in various European cities, including Berlin and Prague. In 1940 Nabokov and his wife and son fled the Nazis for America, where he taught college and wroteLolita, published in 1955. After that book's tremendous success, he was able to write full-time and moved back to Europe, eventually settling in Montreaux, Switzerland. Among his other notable books arePale Fire (1962) and Ada (1969). In addition to his writing, he was a noted entomologist specializing in butterflies. He died in 1977.
Dan Chaon is the author of the novels Await Your Reply and You Remind Me of Me, and two short story collections, Fitting Ends and the 2001 National Book Award FinalistAmong the Missing. His work has appeared in numerous magazines, including Story, Ploughshares, and TriQuarterly, as well as Best American Short Storiesand The Pushcart Prize 2000. The recipient of numerous prizes and honors, he is the Pauline Delaney Professor of Creative Writing and Literature at Oberlin College.

Kelly Hurley is an Associate Professor of English at the University of Colorado at Boulder, where she teaches Victorian studies, literary theory, and popular culture. She is the author ofThe Gothic Body: Sexuality, Materialism, and Degeneration at the Fin de Siècle, as well as various articles on Victorian and contemporary Gothic. Her next book is on horror film spectatorship.

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