Sixty Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm

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Weathervane Books, 1979 - Social Science - 325 pages
1 Review
Sixty classic fairy tales, including such childhood favorites as Hansel and Gretel, the Frog Prince, Rapunzel, Red Riding Hood, and more, are all here in this delightful collection that features the extraordinary artwork of Arthur Rackham in 16 full-color plates as well as black and white line art. A wonderful book for every child's library.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - runner_roader - LibraryThing

This collection of fairy tales are enjoyable to read, but do carry a darker tone than most common day fairy tales. We can see that even in a fairy tale there are signs of a harsher time in life. Not every story ends with a happy ending. Read full review

About the author (1979)

Jacob W. Grimm (1785-1863) and his brother Wilhelm K. Grimm (1786-1859) pioneered the study of German philosophy, law, mythology and folklore, but they are best known for their collection of fairy tales. These include such popular stories as Red Riding Hood, Sleeping Beauty and The Frog Prince. Commonly referred to now as Grimm's Fairy Tales, their collection was published as Kinder-und-Hausmarchen (Children's and Household Tales, 1812-15). The brothers were born thirteen months apart in the German province of Hesse, and were inseparable from childhood. Throughout their lives they showed a marked lack of sibling rivalry. Most of their works were written together, a practice begun in childhood when they shared a desk and sustained throughout their adult lives. Since their lives and work were so collaborative, it is difficult now to differentiate between them, but of course there were differences.- Jacob, who studied for a time in Paris, was fascinated with variant spellings of older words. He articulated "Grimm's Law," the rules of which are still used today to determine correspondences between the consonants of German and languages in the Indo-European family. Jacob was bolder and more experimental than Wilhelm, and was rumored to be a lively dancer. Throughout his life, Jacob kept rigidly to schedule and could be extremely focused on work that demanded close attention to detail. He never married, but was a loving uncle to Wilhelm's children. Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm are buried side by side in Berlin.

Wilhelm K. Grimm (1786-1859) and his brother Jacob W. Grimm (1785-1863) pioneered the study of German philosophy, law, mythology and folklore, but they are best known for their collection of fairy tales. These include such popular stories as Red Riding Hood, Sleeping Beauty and The Frog Prince. Commonly referred to now as Grimm's Fairy Tales, the collection was published as Kinder-und-Hausmarchen (Children's and Household Tales, 1812-15). The brothers were born thirteen months apart in the German province of Hesse, and were inseparable from childhood. Throughout their lives they showed a marked lack of sibling rivalry. Most of their works were written together, a practice begun in childhood when they shared a desk and sustained throughout their adult lives. Since their lives and work were so collaborative, it is difficult now to differentiate between them, but of course there were differences. Wilhelm, the younger of the two, was said to have been gentle and poetic, and his brother claimed that he was a gifted public speaker. He studied at Marburg, then went to Cassel. In 1825, at the age of 39, he married Dorschen Wild, a playmate from his childhood, who accepted his close ties to his brother without question. Wilhelm enjoyed being married and was a devoted husband and father. Wilhelm and Jacob Grimm are buried side by side in Berlin.

Arthur Rackham was born in London, England. At the age of 18, he worked as a clerk at the Westminster Fire Office and began studying part-time at the Lambeth School of Art. In 1892 he left his job and started working for The Westminster Budget as a reporter and illustrator. His first book illustrations were published in 1893 in To the Other Side by Thomas Rhodes, but his first serious commission was in 1894 for The Dolly Dialogues, the collected sketches of Anthony Hope, who later went on to write The Prisoner of Zenda. Book illustrating then became Rackham's career for the rest of his life. Rackham invented his own unique technique which resembled photographic reproduction; he would first sketch an outline of his drawing, then lightly block in shapes and details. Afterwards he would add lines in pen and India ink, removing the pencil traces after it had dried. With color pictures, he would then apply multiple washes of color until transparent tints were created. Arthur Rackham died in 1939 of cancer in his home in Limpsfield, Surrey.

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