American Empire: The Rise of a Global Power, the Democratic Revolution at Home, 1945-2000

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Viking, 2012 - History - 530 pages
7 Reviews

A compelling look at the movements and developments that propelled America to world dominance

In this landmark work, acclaimed historian Joshua Freeman has created an epic portrait of a nation both galvanized by change and driven by conflict. Beginning in 1945, the economic juggernaut awakened by World War II transformed a country once defined by its regional character into a uniform and cohesive power and set the stage for the United States' rise to global dominance. Meanwhile, Freeman locates the profound tragedy that has shaped the path of American civic life, unfolding how the civil rights and labor movements worked for decades to enlarge the rights of millions of Americans, only to watch power ultimately slip from individual citizens to private corporations. Moving through McCarthyism and Vietnam, from the Great Society to Morning in America, Joshua Freeman's sweeping story of a nation's rise reveals forces at play that will continue to affect the future role of American influence and might in the greater world.

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Review: American Empire: The Rise of a Global Power, the Democratic Revolution at Home 1945-2000 (The Penguin History of the United States #5)

User Review  - Mark - Goodreads

Joshua Freeman's book provides a comprehensive overview of American history since World War II. He organizes his narrative around three themes: the postwar growth enjoyed by the American economy, the ... Read full review

Review: American Empire: The Rise of a Global Power, the Democratic Revolution at Home 1945-2000 (The Penguin History of the United States #5)

User Review  - Ian Rocksborough-smith - Goodreads

Great post-45 survey - integrates analysis of US empire and critical views of exceptionalism. Read full review

About the author (2012)

Joshua B. Freeman is a professor of history at Queens College and the CUNY Graduate Center in New York. He is the author most recently of Working-Class New York. He lives in New York City.

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