Courage Has No Color: The True Story of the Triple Nickles : America's First Black Paratroopers

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Candlewick Press, 2013 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 147 pages
23 Reviews
 A 2014 YALSA Excellence in Nonfiction Finalist

They became America's first black paratroopers. Why was their story never told? Sibert Medalist Tanya Lee Stone reveals the history of the Triple Nickles during World War II.


World War II is raging, and thousands of American soldiers are fighting overseas against the injustices brought on by Hitler. Back on the home front, the injustice of discrimination against African Americans plays out as much on Main Street as in the military. Enlisted black men are segregated from white soldiers and regularly relegated to service duties. At Fort Benning, Georgia, First Sergeant Walter Morris's men serve as guards at The Parachute School, while the white soldiers prepare to be paratroopers. Morris knows that for his men to be treated like soldiers, they have to train and act like them, but would the military elite and politicians recognize the potential of these men as well as their passion for serving their country? Tanya Lee Stone examines the role of African Americans in the military through the history of the Triple Nickles, America's first black paratroopers, who fought in a little-known attack on the American West by the Japanese. The 555th Parachute Infantry Battalion, in the words of Morris, "proved that the color of a man had nothing to do with his ability."

From Courage Has No Color
What did it take to be a paratrooper in World War II? Specialized training, extreme physical fitness, courage, and -- until the 555th Parachute Infantry Battalion (the Triple Nickles) was formed -- white skin.
It is 1943. Americans are overseas fighting World War II to help keep the world safe from Adolf Hitler's tyranny, safe from injustice, safe from discrimination. Yet right here at home, people with white skin have rights that people with black skin do not.
What is courage? What is strength? Perhaps it is being ready to fight for your nation even when your nation isn't ready to fight for you.
  

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Review: Courage Has No Color: The True Story of the Triple Nickles, America's First Black Paratroopers

User Review  - Bethany - Goodreads

1. Text to World: This book discusses segregation and would fit well reading it during black history month and correlate well with books about George Washington Carver and Martin Luther King. 2. Bloom ... Read full review

Review: Courage Has No Color: The True Story of the Triple Nickles, America's First Black Paratroopers

User Review  - Ariel Russell - Goodreads

• Genre in which book belongs and intended age range The genre in which this book belongs is informational. The intended age range of the book is 5th grade through 8th grade. • Simple one or two ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
6
Section 3
7
Section 4
16
Section 5
22
Section 6
23
Section 7
31
Section 8
39
Section 11
69
Section 12
73
Section 13
74
Section 14
76
Section 15
85
Section 16
95
Section 17
113
Section 18
114

Section 9
55
Section 10
67

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About the author (2013)

Tanya Lee Stone is the Robert F. Sibert Award–winning author of Almost Astronauts: 13 Women Who Dared to Dream. This new book was seven years in the making, as she did extensive original research and tracked down archival photos. Tanya Lee Stone lives in Vermont.

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