How the Internet Works

Front Cover
Que, 2002 - Computers - 340 pages
4 Reviews
This book explains the internet and the technologies that make it work. You will: closely examine new technologies such as Java, ActiveX, Agents and Web Sound ; see how Push technologies can broadcast information to your computer ; learn how email, surfing the internet, and using a web browser really work ; understand how RealAudio and Virtual Reality work on a web page ; discover how to make phone calls on the internet ; and explore the growing world of web commerce and learn how to purchase products securely through the internet.

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Review: How the Internet Works (How It Works)

User Review  - Hari Krishna - Goodreads

Feeling excited to read this book Read full review

Review: How the Internet Works (How It Works)

User Review  - Scott Taylor - Goodreads

A great overall and categorized depiction of the various machines, sequences of ones and zeros, connections, standards, and abstractions which make up the internet. Concepts are illustrated with lots ... Read full review

About the author (2002)

Preston Gralla is the award-winning author of 17 books, including the best-selling How the Internet Works, The Complete Idiot's Guide to Buying a PC, and The Complete Idiot's Guide to Online Shopping. He has written about computer technology and the Internet and has been a columnist for many magazines and newspapers, including USA Today, PC Magazine, the Los Angeles Times, Boston Magazine, PC/Computing, and FamilyPC. He has won several writing and editing awards, including one for the best feature article in a computer magazine from the Computer Press Association. He is also a columnist for the Dallas Morning News.

Gralla is also Executive Editor for ZDNet, at www.zdnet.com, which is consistently rated the number-one news and information site on the Internet. As a well-known expert on computers and the Internet, he has appeared frequently on numerous TV and radio shows, such as the CBS Early Show, CNN, MSNBC, CNBC, and National Public Radio's All Things Considered.

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