The Little Match Girl

Front Cover
Phyllis Fogelman Books, 1999 - Juvenile Fiction - 32 pages
40 Reviews
Adapted and illustrated by a three-time Caldecott Honor winner, this interpretation of a classic Hans Christian Andersen tale transforms the little Danish girl into a child straight from America's melting pot. Pinkney draws the reader into 20th century streets to witness the plight of the poor in the mist of wealth.

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Wonderful illustrations! - Goodreads
I love that the ending wasn't changed. - Goodreads
The art work was fascinating. - Goodreads

Review: The Little Match Girl

User Review  - Drew Graham - Goodreads

(4.5) It's a bitterly cold New Year's Eve night, and a barefoot, threadbare, barefoot little girl is selling matches on the snowy streets. Driven to desperation, she decides to strike one of her wares ... Read full review

Review: The Little Match Girl

User Review  - Priscilla Zmolek - Goodreads

such a sad story but really good as well. I wish I could have done something for this little girl makes me sad because still today there are a lot of children just like her. Read full review

About the author (1999)

Acclaimed American artist Jerry Pinkney was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on December 22, 1939. He began drawing as a four-year-old child, studied commercial art at the Dobbins Vocational School, and received a full scholarship to the Philadelphia Museum College of Art. After graduating, Pinkney worked in design and illustrations, helped found Kaleidoscope Studios, and later opened the Jerry Pinkney Studio. Pinkney is well-known as a children's book illustrator and has created the art for over one hundred titles, including Julius Lester's John Henry, Sam and the Tigers, and The Old African, plus adaptations of Hans Christian Andersen's The Little Match Girl and The Nightingale. He has won five Caldecott Honor Medals, five Coretta Scott King Awards, four Coretta Scott King Honor Awards, four New York Times Best Illustrated Book awards, the Hamilton King Award, and many others. He received the Virginia Hamilton Literary award from Kent State University in 2000, the University of Southern Mississippi Medallion in 2004, and the Original Art's Lifetime Achievement Award from the Society of Illustrators in 2006. Pinkney was awarded the 2009 Caldecott Medal. In addition to holding numerous one-man retrospectives and exhibiting his work in more than one hundred international group shows, Pinkney's art resides in the permanent collections of the Library of Congress, the New York Public Library, the Delaware Art Museum, and the Brandywine River Art Museum. He has taught art at the Pratt Institute, the University of Delaware, and the University of Buffalo.

Hans Christian Andersen, one of the best known figures in literature, is best know for combining traditional folk tales with his own great imagination to produce fairy tales known to most children today. The Danish writer was born in the slums of Odense. Although he was raised in poverty, he eventually attended Copenhagen University. Although Andersen wrote poems, plays and books, he is best known for his Fairy Tales and Other Stories, written between 1835 and 1872. This work includes such famous tales as The Emperor's New Clothes, Little Ugly Duckling, The Tinderbox, Little Claus and Big Claus, Princess and the Pea, The Snow Queen, The Little Mermaid, The Nightingale, The Story of a Mother and The Swineherd. Andersen's greatest work is still influential today, helping mold some of the works of writers ranging from Charles Dickens to Oscar Wilde and inspiring many of the works of Disney and other motion pictures. Andersen, who traveled greatly during his life, died in his home in Rolighed on August 4, 1875.

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