Long Green: The Rise and Fall of Tobacco in South Carolina

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University of Georgia Press, Jul 14, 2000 - History - 304 pages
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The first comprehensive history of Bright Leaf tobacco culture of any state to appear in fifty years, this book explores tobacco's influence in South Carolina from its beginnings in the colonial period to its heyday at the turn of the century, the impact of the Depression, the New Deal, and World War II, and on to present-day controversies about health risks due to smoking.

The book examines the tobacco growers' struggle against the monopolistic practices of manufacturers, explains the failures of the cooperative reform movement and the Hoover administration's farm policies, and describes how Franklin Delano Roosevelt's New Deal rescued southern agriculture from the Depression and forged a lasting and successful partnership between tobacco farmers and government. The technological revolutions of the post-World War II era and subsequent tobacco economy hardships due to increasingly negative public perception of tobacco use are also highlighted.The book details the roles and motives of key individuals in the development of tobacco culture, including firsthand experiences related by farmers and warehousemen, and offers informed speculations on the future of tobacco culture. Long Green allows readers to better understand the full significance of this cash crop in the history and economy of South Carolina and the American South.

  

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Contents

Tobacco Doth Here Grow Very Well 16701810
1
Years of the Locust 18651885
17
Pearl of the Pee Dee 18851918
46
Reform and Reaction 19181926
78
The Abyss 1926 1932
108
The Lord Mr Roosevelt and Bright Leaf Redemption 19331935
139
War and Peace 19361950
162
Advance Retreat and Retrenchment 19501990s
179
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About the author (2000)

Eldred E. Prince Jr. is a professor of history at Coastal Carolina University. Robert R. Simpson was a professor of history at Coker College and director of the Pee Dee Heritage Foundation.

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