Lawrence Durrell: Conversations

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Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press, 1998 - Biography & Autobiography - 261 pages
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This collection brings together for the first time over thirty interviews with one of the most fascinating major writers of the latter half of the twentieth century. The interviews demonstrate the range of his concerns over a period of four decades and mark the uniqueness of his voice as an author. The first interview, originally published in the Paris Review, reveals a Durrell launched into fame with the publication in the late 1950s of what continues to be his best-known work, The Alexandria Quartet. With the last interview, Durrell has completed The Avignon Quintet and his career as a novelist. In the thirty years between the appearance of these two conversations, he established his reputation as not only a novelist but also a poet, a writer of travel books, and even a playwright. This collection contains the elements expected of an author's responses to academics and representatives of the media. Durrell speaks of the influences on his early writing, especially what he learned from such radically different mentors as T. S. Eliot and Henry Miller, and of his efforts to free himself from work for the British Foreign Office in the first two decades of his adult life. He answers specific questions about most of his writings and indicates what he reconstructs as his intent in writing them.
  

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Contents

III
21
IV
37
V
39
VI
44
VII
54
VIII
63
IX
64
X
70
XX
163
XXI
173
XXII
182
XXIII
187
XXIV
192
XXV
201
XXVI
213
XXVII
215

XI
76
XII
89
XIII
94
XIV
99
XV
105
XVI
118
XVII
125
XVIII
132
XIX
149
XXVIII
227
XXIX
230
XXX
234
XXXI
239
XXXII
243
XXXIII
245
XXXIV
257
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About the author (1998)

Lawrence Durrell was born on February 27, 1912 in Jullundur, India to British parents. During World War II, he served as a British press officer. His first novel, Pied Piper of Lovers, was published in 1935, but was considered a failure. Some of his other works include The Black Book, The Alexandria Quartet, The Avignon Quintet, and Caesar's Vast Ghost: A Portrait of Provence. Bitter Lemons won the Duff Cooper Prize in 1959. He died on November 7, 1990 at the age of 78.

Earl G. Ingersoll is distinguished professor emeritus of English at SUNY College at Brockport. He has written, edited, and coedited many books, including Conversations with May Sarton and Conversations with Rita Dove (both published by University Press of Mississippi).

Bibliographic information