Muhammad Ali's Greatest Fight: Cassius Clay Vs. the United States of America

Front Cover
Rowman & Littlefield, 2000 - Sports & Recreation - 271 pages
10 Reviews
In 1966, Muhammad Ali announced his intention to refuse induction into the United States Army as a conscientious objector. This set off a five-year battle that would strip him of his world heavyweight title, bar him from boxing, and nearly send him to prison - all at the peak of his career as the greatest boxer in history.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - foof2you - LibraryThing

The story I thought I knew until I read the book! A fascinating look at this period of American History and how Ali came back to regain his heavyweight title. From hero to goat to hero a remarkable story. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - GaryLeeJones - LibraryThing

This is a conversational general reader's account of Ali's experiences before, during, and after his refusal to submit to induction into the US armed forces during the Vietnam War era. His reasons ... Read full review

Contents

Foreword
9
Chapter One Louisville and the Lip
11
Chapter Two Those Who Came Before
29
Chapter Three A Modern Crusade
51
Chapter Four The Making of Muhammad Ali
79
Chapter Five I Aint Got No Quarrel with Them Vietcong
103
Chapter Six The Step
133
Chapter Seven Backlash
161
Chapter Eight Exile
183
Chapter Nine Return from the Wilderness
209
Chapter Ten Vindication
237
Afterword
251
Acknowledgments
261
Sources
263
Index
269
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Howard Bingham has documented much of the history of our times with millions of still images. He authored Muhammad Ali: A Thirty Year Journeyand Muhammad Ali's Greatest Fight. As a photographer for Life, Look, Time, Newsweek, Sports Illustrated, People Ebony and many other international publications, Bingham has documented the most important events and peronalities of our time. He is the personal photographer to the families of Muhammad Ali and Bill Cosby.

Max Wallace is a recipient of "Rolling Stone" magazines Award for Investigative Journalism; he is also a documentary filmmaker. In 1998, he coauthored the international bestseller "Who Killed Kurt Cobain?" with Ian Halperin. He is also the author of "Muhammad Alis Greatest Fight: Cassius Clay vs. the United States of America, " and "The American Axis: Ford, Lindbergh, and the Rise of the Third Reich." His first documentary film, "Too Colorful for the League, " was nominated for a Gemini Award (Canadas equivalent of an Emmy). Max has been a guest columnist for the Sunday "New York Times, " and contributed to the BBC.

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