Ancient Egyptian Science: Calendars, clocks, and astronomy (Google eBook)

Front Cover
American Philosophical Society, 1995 - Philosophy - 575 pages
2 Reviews
This volume is part of Marshall Clagett's three-volume study of the various aspects of science of Ancient Egypt. Volume Two covers calendars, clocks, and astonomical monuments. Within each area of treatment there is a fair chronology evident as benefits a historical work covering three millenia of activity. Includes more than 100 illustrations of documents and scientific objects.
  

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Contents

IV
1
V
131
VI
166
VII
167
VIII
177
IX
193
X
217
XI
235
XXVII
357
XXVIII
371
XXX
393
XXXI
399
XXXIII
405
XXXIV
420
XXXV
457
XXXVI
463

XII
239
XIV
253
XV
265
XVII
279
XVIII
291
XX
293
XXII
295
XXIII
307
XXIV
321
XXV
341
XXVI
347
XXXVII
471
XXXIX
493
XL
506
XLI
507
XLIII
521
XLIV
535
XLV
566
XLVI
567
XLVII
577
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Page 421 - Nous avons donc ici une table des influences, analogue à celle qu'on avait gravée sur le fameux cercle doré du monument d'Osimandyas, et qui donnait, comme le dit Diodore de Sicile, les heures du lever des constellations avec les influences de chacune d'elles. Cela démontrera sans réplique
Page 421 - Ce sont des tables des constellations et de leurs influences pour toutes les heures de chaque mois de l'année; elles sont ainsi conçues: "Mois de Tôbi, la dernière moitié. — Orion domine et influe sur l'oreille gauche. "Heure
Page 407 - days. Each column contains thirteen entries, one for the beginning of the night, and one for each of the twelve hours. Throughout the Calendar a star occurs in one of seven positions, "the middle," the right eye, ear or shoulder, or the left eye, ear or shoulder. The position is not merely described in words, but
Page 412 - some years back, first of all to ascertain the date at which the Calendar was drawn up, and, secondly, to identify a certain number of the asterisms which it contains. The method which I adopted was this: "Whatever may have been the length of the Egyptian hours of the night, the sixth
Page 413 - This inference of date," as the Astronomer Royal remarks, "is necessarily a very vague one but from the whole nature of the case a vague date is all that can be asked for. It is sufficient for us to know that the Calendar records observations
Page 518 - (1924), pp. 43-50. Sloley, RW, "Primitive Methods of Measuring Time with Special Reference to Egypt," The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology,
Page 413 - The approximate date of the Calendar being known, the next question is, what remarkable stars at that date culminated at the intervals before and after Sirius, which are assigned by the Calendar to its asterisms? And finding, for instance, that in 1450 BC the approximate Right Ascension of
Page 422 - dissertation. The fundamental hypothesis of this dissertation is that the Calendar is a record, for astrological purposes, of the risings of stars and constellations. This hypothesis Is entirely without foundation in the Egyptian text, which contains no allusion whatever either to astrology or to risings of stars. M.
Page 625 - VII VIII IX X XI XII 1 II III IV V VI VII
Page 408 - month, and two hours later on the thirty-first night, cannot possibly be many degrees distant from the meridian at the eleventh hour of the sixteenth night. This is true, even upon the supposition that the hours of the Calendar may vary in length according to the season.

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