My Second Death

Front Cover
Tyrus Books, Jan 18, 2013 - Fiction - 335 pages
10 Reviews

In Lydia Cooper's wry and absorbing debut novel, we are introduced to Mickey Brandis, a brilliant twenty-eight-year-old doctoral candidate in medieval literature who is part Lisbeth Salander and part Dexter. She lives in her parents' garage and swears too often, but she never complains about the rain or cold, she rarely eats dead animals, and she hasn't killed a man since she was ten. Her life is dull and predictable but legal, and she intends to keep it that way.

But the careful existence Mickey has created in adulthood is upended when she is mysteriously led to a condemned house where she discovers an exquisitely mutilated corpse. The same surreal afternoon, she is asked by a timid, wall-eyed art student to solve a murder that occurred twenty years earlier. While she gets deeper and deeper into the investigation, she begins to lose hold on her tenuous connection to reality--to her maddening students and graduate thesis advisor; to her stoic parents, who are no longer speaking; to her confused, chameleon-like adolescent brother; and to her older brother, Dave, a zany poet who is growing increasingly erratic and keenly interested in Mickey's investigation.

Driven by an unforgettable voice, and filled with razor-sharp wit and vivid characters, My Second Death is a smart, suspenseful novel and a provocative examination of family, loyalty, the human psyche, and the secrets we keep to save ourselves.

  

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Review: My Second Death

User Review  - Lectus - Goodreads

Interesting concept for a character. For me, the story fell flat and I couldn't even bring myself to finish it. Read full review

Review: My Second Death

User Review  - Charles Polk - Goodreads

I really enjoyed this book. It was well written and hard to put down. What engaged me most was not so much the murder mystery as the exploration of Mickey's character and the questions of right and wrong. This was a smartly written story and while it was dark it was not hopeless. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
5
Section 2
7
Section 3
19
Section 4
27
Section 5
37
Section 6
59
Section 7
65
Section 8
77
Section 18
189
Section 19
195
Section 20
209
Section 21
223
Section 22
235
Section 23
251
Section 24
257
Section 25
267

Section 9
87
Section 10
97
Section 11
107
Section 12
121
Section 13
137
Section 14
153
Section 15
161
Section 16
169
Section 17
177
Section 26
271
Section 27
277
Section 28
283
Section 29
289
Section 30
297
Section 31
305
Section 32
313
Section 33
323
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Lydia Cooper is an assistant professor of American literature and has taught at universities and in community workshops. She has numerous academic publications, including peer-reviewed journals, a chapter in a book, and a book on Cormac McCarthy that was published as part of Louisiana State University Press's Southern Writers Series.

Bibliographic information