The Boys of '67: Charlie Company's War in Vietnam

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Osprey Publishing, 2012 - History - 376 pages
15 Reviews

When the 160 men of Charlie Company (4th Battalion/47th Infantry/9th ID) were drafted by the US Army in May 1966, they were part of the wave of conscription that would swell the American military to 80,000 combat troops in theater by the height of the war in 1968. In the spring of 1966, the war was still popular and the draftees of Charlie Company saw their service as a rite of passage. But by December 1967, when the company rotated home, only 30 men were not casualties--and they were among the first vets of the war to be spit on and harassed by war protestors as they arrived back the U.S.
 
In his new book, The Boys of '67, Andy Wiest, the award-winning author of Vietnam's Forgotten Army and The Vietnam War 1956-1975, examines the experiences of a company from the only division in the Vietnam era to train and deploy together in similar fashion to WWII's famous 101st Airborne Division.
 
Wiest interviewed more than 50 officers and enlisted men who served with Charlie Company, including the surviving platoon leaders and both of the company's commanders. (One of the platoon leaders, Lt Jack Benedick, lost both of his legs, but went on to become a champion skier.) In addition, he interviewed 15 family members of Charlie Company veterans, including wives, children, parents, and siblings. Wiest also had access to personal papers, collections of letters, a diary, an abundance of newspaper clippings, training notebooks, field manuals, condolence letters, and photographs from before, during, and after the conflict.
 
As Wiest shows, the fighting that Charlie Company saw in 1967 was nearly as bloody as many of the better publicized battles, including the infamous 'Ia Drang' and 'Hamburger Hill.' As a result, many of the surviving members of Charlie Company came home with what the military now recognizes as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder--a diagnosis that was not recognized until the late 1970s and was not widely treated until the 1980s. Only recently, after more than 40 years, have many members of Charlie Company achieved any real and sustained relief from their suffering. 

  

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Review: The Boys of '67: Charlie Company's War in Vietnam

User Review  - Richard Taylor - Goodreads

This is an excellent accounting of one company in Vietnam. It provides strong insights and is written well. Read full review

Review: The Boys of '67: Charlie Company's War in Vietnam

User Review  - Chris Gillies - Goodreads

This book has the dubious honour of being only the second book I've never finished. Initially this book was very hard to get into. Names of people are rattled off at will, scenes are set for a number ... Read full review

Contents

Meeting Charlie
7
The Need for Charlie
17
Losing the Best We Had
24
Who Was Charlie?
31
Training
50
To Vietnam and into the Rung Sat
86
Into Battle
127
The Day Everything Changed
158
Home From War
289
Glossary
341
The Men of Charlie Company
346
Bibliography
359
Acknowledgements
364
Dedication
367
Index
368
Imprint
377

The Steady Drumbeat of War
208
Charlie Transformed Battlefield Coda and the Freedom Bird
242
Back Cover
378
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Andrew Wiest, Ph.D. is Professor of History at the University of Southern Mississippi.  Also the founding director of the Center for the Study of War and Society, Wiest was born in Chicago, but raised in Hattiesburg, Mississippi.  After attending the University of Southern Mississippi for his undergraduate and Master's degrees, Dr. Wiest went on to receive his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois, Chicago in 1990.  Specializing in the study of World War I and Vietnam, Dr. Wiest has served as a Visiting Senior Lecturer at the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst in the United Kingdom and as a Visiting Professor in the Department of Warfighting Strategy in the United States Air Force Air War College.  Since 1992 Dr. Wiest has been active in international education, leading a study abroad program on World War II to London and Normandy each summer, and developing the award-winning Vietnam Study Abroad Program.  Dr. Wiest has published 14 books on various topics in the field of Military History, including Vietnam's Forgotten Army: Heroism and Betrayal in the ARVN (New York University Press), which won the Society for Military History's Distinguished Book Award; America and the Vietnam War (Routledge Press); Rolling Thunder in a Gentle Land (Osprey Press); and Passchendaele and the Royal Navy (Greenwood Press).  Additionally Dr. Wiest has appeared in and consulted on several historical documentaries for the History Channel, Granada Television, PBS, the BBC, and for Lucasfilm.  Dr. Wiest lives in Hattiesburg with his wife Jill and their three children Abigail, Luke and Wyatt.

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