Archform: Beauty

Front Cover
Orbit, 2003 - Investigative reporting - 434 pages
5 Reviews
Four centuries in the future nanomachines watch over the health of the wealthy and manufacture food and gadgets for everybody, and the world is rich. But this is no Utopia. This is a society where technology takes care of everyone's basic needs but leaves most people struggling to extract a meaningful life from a world crowded with wonders but empty of commitment and human connection. Modesitt overlaps and combines the voices and experiences of five very different people, and builds their disparate stories into a brilliant tale of future crime and investigation, aesthetic challenge and personal triumph. L.E. Modesitt, Jr. asks difficult questions, sets himself unlikely challenges, and once again delivers an absorbing tale that enlightens, entertains, and uplifts all at once.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - asciiphil - LibraryThing

A lot of critics seem to like Archform: Beauty, and I can't really disagree with them. It tells its story from five points of view, switching among them as it progresses. Despite the title and the ... Read full review

Review: Archform: Beauty (Archform: Beauty #1)

User Review  - Craig - Goodreads

This is pretty good science fiction story, with the plot advanced by five alternating viewpoint characters. It all ties up to a satisfying conclusion, though it seems a bit rushed and comes together ... Read full review

About the author (2003)

Leland Exton Modesitt, Jr., was born on October 19, 1943 in Denver to Leland Exton and Nancy Lila Modesitt. He was educated at Williams College and earned a graduate degree from the University of Denver. Modesitt's career has included stints as a navy lieutenant, a market research analyst, and a real estate sales associate. He has also held various positions within the U.S. government as a legislative assistant and as director of several agencies. In the early 1980s, he was a lecturer in science fiction writing at Georgetown University. After graduation, Modesitt began to write, but he did not have a novel published until he was 39 years old. He believes that a writer must "simultaneously entertain, educate and inspire... [failing any one of these goals], the book will fall flat." A part-time writer, he produces an average of one book per year, but he would eventually like to write full-time. The underlying themes of many of his science fiction novels are drawn from his work in government work and involve the various aspects of power and how it changes the people and the structure of government. Usually, his protagonist is an average individual with hero potential. Much of his "Forever Hero Trilogy"--Dawn for a Distant Earth, The Silent Warrior, and In Endless Twilight--is based on his experiences working with the Environmental Protection Agency. He made The New York Times Best Seller List in 2012 with his title Princeps.

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