Practical Programming: An Introduction to Computer Science Using Python, Volume 10

Front Cover
Pragmatic Bookshelf, 2009 - Computers - 363 pages
4 Reviews

Welcome to computer science in the 21st century. Did you ever wonder how computers represent DNA? How they can download a web page containing population data and analyze it to spot trends? Or how they can change the colors in a color photograph? If so, this book is for you. By the time you're done, you'll know how to do all of that and a lot more. And Python makes it easy and fun.

Computers are used in every part of science from ecology to particle physics. This introduction to computer science continually reinforces those ties by using real-world science problems as examples. Anyone who has taken a high school science class will be able to follow along as the book introduces the basics of programming, then goes on to show readers how to work with databases, download data from the web automatically, build graphical interfaces, and most importantly, how to think like a professional programmer.

Topics covered include:

Basic elements of programming from arithmetic to loops and if statements.

Using functions and modules to organize programs.

Using lists, sets, and dictionaries to organize data.

Designing algorithms systematically.

Debugging things when they go wrong.

Creating and querying databases.

Building graphical interfaces to make programs easier to use.

Object-oriented programming and programming patterns.

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Practical Programming: An Introduction to Computer Science Using Python

User Review  - Joe - Goodreads

Mostly useful as a quick Python syntax reference, and as a good source for real-world practice problems ("Sort the DNA strings in a list" and "emulate traffic patterns in a grid with variables for ... Read full review

Review: Practical Programming: An Introduction to Computer Science Using Python

User Review  - Tanner Welsh - Goodreads

Well structured overview of essential programming concepts and common logic. A good primer for anyone interested in learning to code, especially in Python. Most of the chapters cover topics that are applicable to other high-level languages, but there are some Python-specific parts as well. Read full review

About the author (2009)

Jennifer Campbell is a senior lecturer in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Toronto. Over the past 10 years, Jen's primary focus has been on teaching and curriculum design of introductory courses. Jen is involved in several projects exploring student experiences in introductory computer science courses and the factors that contribute to success, including the effectiveness of the inverted classroom.

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