The Essential Writings

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Fordham University Press, 2013 - Philosophy - 543 pages
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Jean-Luc Marion: The Essential Writings is the first anthology of this major contemporary philosopher's writings. It spans his entire career as a historian of philosophy, as a theologian, and as a theoretician of "saturated phenomena." This "reader" has a long introduction, written by the editor, that seeks to situate Marion in the history of modern philosophy, especially phenomenology, as well as shorter introduction to each section of the anthology. This book enables professors and teachers to teach Jean-Luc Marion by setting just the one book, and the long general introduction allows students to get up to speed with phenomenology in order to read Marion without having to take preliminary courses in Husserl and Heidegger.

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About the author (2013)


Jean-Luc Marion is The Andrew Greeley and Grace McNichols Greeley Professor at the University of Chicago Divinity School, Department of Philosophy, and Committee on Social Thought; Dominique Dubarle Chair of Philosophy at L'Institut Catholique de Paris; Professor Emeritus at the University of Paris IV's Sorbonne, and a member of the Acadmie Franaise. His other books for Fordham include The Idol and Distance; Prolegomena to Charity; In Excess; Studies of Saturated Phenomena; On the Ego and On God Further Cartesian Questions; The Visible and the Revealed; and, as co-author, Phenomenology and the "Theological Turn": The French Debate.

Kevin Hart is Edwin B. Kyle Professor of Christian Studies in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Virginia, where he also holds courtesy professorships in the Departments of English and French. He is also Eric D'Arcy Professor of Philosophy at the Australian Catholic University in Melbourne. Among his most recent books are Clandestine Encounters: Philosophy in the Narratives of Maurice Blanchot and, co-edited with Michael A. Signer, The Exorbitant:Emmanuel Levinas between Jews and Christians.