Male Peer Support and Violence Against Women: The History and Verification of a Theory

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UPNE, 2013 - Family & Relationships - 203 pages
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In 1988, Walter S. DeKeseredy announced Male Peer Support (MPS) Theory, which popularized the notion that certain all-male peer groups encourage, justify, and support the abuse of women. In 1993, DeKeseredy and Martin D. Schwartz modified and expanded MPS Theory. Today, after twenty-five years of research, numerous studies from a diverse range of fields and practitioners support the original claim, providing a powerful explanation for the mechanism that underlies much of North Americaís violence against women. This book provides a history of the theory, traces its development and uses over a quarter century, and offers an update on Internet-generated abuse.
  

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Contents

1 Definitional Issues in Violence against Women
1
2 The Extent and Distribution of Violence against Women
23
3 The History of Male Peer Support Theory
44
4 Contemporary Male Peer Support Theories
69
5 What Do the Data Say?
93
6 New Electronic Technologies and Male Peer Support
119
Where Do We Go from Here?
137
Notes
155
References
161
Index
197
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About the author (2013)

WALTER S. DEKESEREDY is Anna Deane Carlson Endowed Chair of Social Sciences, West Virginia University. MARTIN D. SCHWARTZ is visiting professor in the Department of Sociology at George Washington University.

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