Waste: a Lecture Delivered at the Bristol Institution for the Advancement of Science, Literature, and the Arts, on Tuesday, February the 10th, 1863 (Google eBook)

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Bell and Daldy, 1863 - Change - 51 pages
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Page 32 - The One remains, the many change and pass ; Heaven's light for ever shines, Earth's shadows fly ; Life, like a dome of many-coloured glass, Stains the white radiance of Eternity, Until Death tramples it to fragments.
Page 46 - Athens arose : a city such as vision Builds from the purple crags and silver towers Of battlemented cloud, as in derision Of kingliest masonry...
Page 15 - Thou makest thine appeal to me: I bring to life, I bring to death: The spirit does but mean the breath: I know no more.
Page 10 - We behold the face of nature bright with gladness, we often see superabundance of food ; we do not see or we forget that the birds which are idly singing round us mostly live on insects or seeds, and are thus constantly destroying life ; or we forget how largely these songsters, or their 'From Chap.
Page 42 - Monophysite controversy were indeed consumed in the public baths, a philosopher may allow, with a smile, that it was ultimately devoted to the benefit of mankind. I sincerely regret the more valuable libraries which have been involved in the ruin of the Roman empire; but, when I seriously compute the lapse of ages, the waste of ignorance, and the calamities of war, our treasures, rather than our losses, are the object of my surprise.
Page 26 - The valuable library of Alexandria was pillaged or destroyed; and near twenty years afterwards, the appearance of the empty shelves excited the regret and indignation of every spectator whose mind was not totally darkened by religious prejudice. The compositions of ancient genius, so many of which have irretrievably perished, might surely have been excepted from the wreck of idolatry, for the amusement and instruction of succeeding ages; and either the zeal or the avarice of the archbishop might...
Page 17 - ICHIOAN 39015 03130 4929 17 non, the Pope found it necessary to consecrate the Rhone, that bodies might be thrown into the river without delay, as the churchyards would no longer hold them ; so, likewise, in all populous cities, extraordinary measures were "adopted, in order speedily to dispose of the dead.
Page 41 - I have heard some with deep sighs lament the lost lines of Cicero; others with as many groans deplore the combustion of the library of Alexandria. For my own part, I think there be too many in the world...
Page 41 - Tis not a melancholy Utinam of my own, but the desires of better heads, that there were a general Synod; not to unite the incompatible difference of Religion, but for the benefit of learning, to reduce it as it lay at first, in a few and solid Authors; and to condemn to the fire those swarms and millions of Rhapsodies, begotten only to distract and abuse the weaker judgements of Scholars, and to maintain the trade and mystery of Typographers.
Page 26 - Romans burnt the books of the Jews, of the Christians, and the philosophers ; the Jews burnt the books of the Christians and the Pagans ; and the Christians burnt the books of the Pagans and the Jews. The greater part of the books of Origen and other heretics were continually burnt by the orthodox party.

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