Working Women of Japan (Google eBook)

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Missionary Education Movement of the United States and Canada, 1915 - Japan - 162 pages
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Page 83 - ... statements as to the fearful overwork of girls and boys in iron and coal mines, which doubtless had been going on from the end of the eighteenth century. Children, being small and handy, were particularly convenient for small veins of coal, and for pits where no great amount of capital was embarked; they could get abo'ut where horses and mules could not. Little girls were forced to carry heavy buckets of coal up high ladders, and little girls and boys, instead of animals, dragged the coal bunkers....
Page 83 - Nor was this unmeasured abuse of child labor,'' says Mr. Hyndman, " confined to the cotton, silk, or wool industries. It spread in every direction. The profit was so great that nothing could stop its development. The report of 1842 is crammed with statements as to the fearful overwork of girls and boys in iron and coal mines, which doubtless had been going on from the end of the eighteenth century. Children, being small and handy, were particularly convenient for small veins of coal, and...
Page 21 - ... children in summer, and the very slight clothing that even adults regard as necessary about the house or in the country during the hot season. In illustration of the last part, I would mention the horror with which many Japanese ladies regard that style of foreign dress which, while covering the figure completely, reveals every detail of the form above the waist, and, as we say, shows off to advantage a pretty figure. To the Japanese mind it is immodest to want to show off a pretty figure. As...
Page 21 - According to the Japanese standard, any exposure of the person that is merely incidental to health, cleanliness, or convenience in doing necessary work is perfectly modest and allowable; but an exposure, no matter how slight, that is simply for show, is in the highest degree indelicate.
Page 15 - ... respected accordingly. The Japanese lady, at her marriage, lays aside her independent existence to become the subordinate and servant of her husband and parents-in-law, and her face, as the years go by, shows how much she has given up, how completely she has sacrificed herself to those about her. The Japanese peasant woman, when she marries, works side by side with her husband, finds life full of interest outside of the simple household work, and, as the years go by, her face shows more individuality,...
Page 15 - There seems no doubt at all that among the peasantry of Japan one finds the women who have the most freedom and independence. Among this class, all through the country, the women, though hardworked and possessing few comforts, lead lives of intelligent, independent labor, and have in the family positions as respected and honored as those held by women in America. Their lives are fuller and happier than those of the women of the higher classes, for they are themselves bread-winners, contributing an...
Page 75 - that out of every one hundred girls to enter upon factory work in Japan, twenty-three die within one year of their return to their homes, and of these fifty per cent die of tuberculosis.
Page 20 - ... the kuruma at every stopping place, one sometimes wonders whether there is in the country any real civilization, whether these half-naked people are not more savage than civilized ; but when one finds everywhere good hotels, scrupulous cleanliness in all the appointments of toilet and table, polite and careful service, honest and willing performance of labor bargained for, together with the gentlest...
Page 83 - Government reports of this period show that children of five and six years of age were frequently employed in factories. Men and women stood at their daily tasks from twelve to fourteen and fifteen hours; a working day of sixteen hours was not an unheard-of thing. Even at that early day the demand was loud for machines that could be tended by women and children; and their husbands and fathers were driven out of the shops...
Page 15 - ... obeyed and respected accordingly. The Japanese lady, at her marriage, lays aside her independent existence to become the subordinate and servant of her husband and parents-in-law, and her face, as the years go by, shows how much she has given up, how completely she has sacrificed herself to those about her. The Japanese peasant woman, when she marries, works side by side with her husband, finds life full of interest outside of the simple household work, and, as she grows older, her face shows...

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