The Histories of Polybius, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Macmillan and Company, 1889 - Greece
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Contents

I
x
II
49
III
79
IV
117
V
123
VI
136
VII
172
VIII
203
XVI
353
XVII
355
XVIII
371
XIX
389
XX
407
XXI
425
XXII
447
XXIII
470

IX
250
X
252
XI
262
XII
302
XIII
320
XIV
336
XV
348
XXIV
480
XXV
493
XXVI
499
XXVII
505
XXVIII
513
XXIX
526
XXX
542

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Popular passages

Page 529 - The day shall be when holy Troy shall fall And Priam, lord of spears, and Priam's folk." And on my asking him boldly (for I had been his tutor) what he meant by these words, he did not name Rome distinctly, but was evidently fearing for her, from this sight of the mutability of human affairs . . . Another still more remarkable saying of his I may record . . . When he had given the order for...
Page 242 - The Senate of Rome and Titus Quintus [Flamininus], proconsul and imperator, having conquered King Philip and the Macedonians in war, declare the following peoples free, without garrison, or tribute, in full enjoyment of the laws of their respective countries: namely, Corinthians, Phocians, Locrians, Euboeans, Achaeans of Phiotis, Magnesians, Thessalians, Perrhaebians.
Page 102 - For a bare statement of an occurrence is interesting indeed, but not instructive; but when this is supplemented by statement of cause, the study of history becomes fruitful. For it is by applying analogies to our own circumstances that we get the means and basis for calculating the future, and for learning from the past when to act with caution, and when with greater boldness, in the present.
Page 311 - Strategus quoting all the treaties, and pointing out in detail the differences between them, which turned out to be important, the assembly demanded to know which it was that it, was renewing. And when no one was able to explain, not even Philopoemen himself, who had been in office when the renewal was made, nor Lycortas and his colleagues, who had been on the mission to Alexandria, these men all began to be regarded as careless In conducting the business of the league; while Aristaenus acquired...
Page 538 - ... personal power as well as that of the Achaeans, he preserved his friendship for Rome with the most absolute fidelity; having joined in the vote of the Achaeans in virtue of which, four months before the Romans crossed from Italy, they levied a war from their own territory upon Antiochus and the ^Etolians, when nearly all the other Greeks had become estranged from the Roman friendship.
Page 22 - ... office of Hipparch, either, from being without any genius themselves for cavalry tactics, do not venture to enforce necessary orders upon others; or, because they are aiming at being elected Strategus, try all through their year of office to attach the young men to themselves and to secure their favor in the coming election; and accordingly never administer necessary reprimands, which are the salvation of the public interests, but hush up all transgressions, and, for the sake of gaining an insignificant...
Page 454 - ... I might see the day on which you would devote your first attention to me, and join your life with mine. From that moment I shall think myself worthy both of my family and my ancestors.
Page 90 - Well, I quite agree that in such writings truth should be the first consideration : and, in fact, somewhere in the course of my work I have said " that as in a living body, when the eyes are out, the whole is rendered useless, so s,^ , , if you take truth from history what is left is but an idle tale.
Page 310 - After these speeches had been delivered, the people showed such signs of enthusiastic approval that no one ventured to speak on the side of the king ; but the whole assembly rejected the offer by acclamation, though its amount certainly made it exceedingly tempting. 12. The next subject introduced for debate was that of King Ptolemy. The ambassadors who had been on the mission to Ptolemy were called forward, and Lycortas, acting as spokesman, began by stating how they had interchanged oaths of alliance...
Page 22 - Being then appointed Hipparch by the Achaean league at this time, and finding the squadrons in a state of utter demoralization and the men thoroughly dispirited, he did not only restore them to a better state than they were, but in a short time made them even superior to the enemy's cavalry by bringing them all to adopt habits of real training and genuine emulation. The fact is that most of those who hold this office of Hipparch, either, from being without any genius themselves for cavalry tactics,...

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