John Pory's lost description of Plymouth colony in the earliest days of the Pilgrim fathers, together with contemporary accounts of English colonization elsewhere in New England and in the Bermudas (Google eBook)

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Houghton Mifflin company, 1918 - Travel - 65 pages
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Page 59 - Ships to supply them, with all their Passengers well, except one, and he presently recovered; for themselves, for all their wants, there was not one sicke person amongst them: the greater Ship they returned fraught with commodities.
Page 54 - Come, till their store was neere all consumed, whereby they became so feeble and weake, some would not, others could not goe abroad to seeke releefe, but starued in their houses, and many that went abroad, through weaknesse were subiect to be suddenly surprized with a disease called the Feauges: which was neither paine nor sicknesse, but as it were the highest degree of weaknesse, depriuing them of power and ability from the execution of any bodily exercises, whether it were working, walking, or...
Page 59 - Planters not one hath died this three yeares: yet at the first landing at Cape Cod, being an hundred passengers, besides twenty they had left behind at Plimoth for want of good take heed, thinking to finde all things better than I advised them, spent six or seven weekes...
Page 53 - ... the space of two yeeres so to abound, before they regarded them, that they filled not onely those places where they were first landed, but swimming from place to place, spread themselues into all parts of the Countrey, insomuch that there was no Hand but it was pestered with them ; and some fishes haue beene taken with rats in their bellies, which they caught in swimming from He to He : their nests they had almost in euery tree, and in most places their burrowes in the ground like conies : they...
Page 56 - South-East, extend further then they haue bin yet well discouered: by reason of those Rocks the Country is naturally very strong, for there is but two places, and scarce two, vnlesse to them who know them well, where shipping may safely come in, and those now are exceeding well fortified, but within...
Page 57 - Rocks before they can come to the shorer it is very vneuen, distributed into hills and dales; the mold is of diuers colours, neither clay nor sand, but a meane betweene; the red which resembleth clay is the worst, the whitest resembling sand and the blackest is good, but the browne betwixt them both which they call white, because there is mingled with it a white meale is the best: vnder the mould two or three foot deep, and sometimes lesse, is a kinde of white hard substance which they call the Rocke:...
Page 59 - At their departure, the parching faire skies all overcast with blacke clouds, and the next morning, such a pleasant moderate raine continued fourteene daies, that it was hard to say, whether their withered fruits or drooping affections were most revived; not long after came two Ships to supply...
Page 53 - Many other deuices they vsed to [1617] destroy them, but could not preuaile, finding them still increasing against them : nay they so deuoured the fruits of the earth, that they were destitute of bread for a yeere or two ; so that when they had it afterwards, they were so wained [weaned] from it, they easily neglected to eat it with their meat.
Page 59 - New-Plimoth, where their Ship left them, and but nine leagues by Sea from where they landed, whose misery and variable opinions, for want of experience, occasioned much faction, till necessity agreed them.
Page 59 - Towne containes two and thirty houses, whereof seven were burnt, with the value of five or six hundred pounds in other goods, impailed about halfe a mile, within which within a high Mount, a Fort, with a Watch-tower, well built of stone, lome, and wood, their Ordnance well mounted...

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