Life and Services of Gen. Anthony Wayne: Founded on Documentary and Other Evidence, Furnished by His Son, Col. Isaac Wayne (Google eBook)

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J. B. Perry, 1845 - 210 pages
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Page 191 - The legion was ]mmcdiatehr formed in two lines, principally in a close, thick wood, which extended for miles on our left, and for a very considerable distance in front, the ground being covered with old fallen timber, probably occasioned by a tornado...
Page 95 - ... to fire, or begin the battle until ordered by his proper officer, he shall be instantly put to death by the officer next him; for the misconduct of one man is not to put the whole 'troops in danger or disorder, and he be suffered to pass with life.
Page 92 - The common weal was his sole object ; nothing selfish, nothing mercenary soiled his ermine character. Fertile in stratagem, he struck unperceived ; and retiring to those hidden retreats, selected by himself, in the morasses of Pedee and Black River, he placed his corps not only out of the reach of his foe, but often out of the discovery of his friends.
Page 61 - Were I to conclude my account of this day's transactions, without expressing my obligations to the officers of the army in general, I should do injustice to their merit, and violence to my own feelings. They seemed to vie with each other in manifesting their zeal and bravery. The catalogue of those, who distinguished themselves, is too long to admit of particularizing individuals. I cannot, however, forbear mentioning Brigadier-General Wayne, whose good conduct and bravery through the whole action...
Page 190 - It is with infinite pleasure that I announce to you the brilliant success of the federal army under my command, in a general action with the combined force of the hostile Indians, and a considerable number of the volunteers and militia of Detroit...
Page 79 - I should in one word say that idleness, dissipation, and extravagance seem to have laid fast hold of most of them; that speculation, peculation, and an insatiable thirst for riches seem to have got the better of every other consideration, and almost of every order of men...
Page 190 - Barbee. A select battalion of mounted volunteers moved in front of the legion, commanded by Major Price, who was directed to keep sufficiently advanced, so as to give timely notice for the troops to form in case of action, it being yet undetermined whether the Indians would decide for peace or war.
Page 191 - All these orders were obeyed with spirit and promptitude ; but such was the impetuosity of the charge by the first line of infantry that the Indians and Canadian militia and volunteers were...
Page 95 - If any soldier presume to take his musket from his shoulder, or to fire, or begin the battle until ordered by his proper officer, he shall be instantly put to death by the officer next him...
Page 209 - He eats little, drinks little, sleeps little, thinks much, and is most decisive and indefatigable in the pursuit of his objects.

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