History of Political Conventions in California: 1849-1892 (Google eBook)

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California State Library, 1893 - Political parties - 711 pages
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Page 282 - ... that this war is not waged upon our part in any spirit of oppression, nor for any purpose of conquest or subjugation, nor purpose of overthrowing or interfering with the rights or established institutions of those States ; but to defend and maintain the supremacy of the Constitution and to preserve the Union, with all the dignity, equality, and rights of the several States, unimpaired; and that as soon as these objects are accomplished the war ought to cease.
Page 100 - That religion or the duty which we owe to our Creator, and the manner of discharging it, can be directed only by reason and conviction, not by force or violence ; and, therefore, all men are equally entitled to the free exercise of religion, according to the dictates of conscience ; and that it is the mutual duty of all to practice Christian forbearance, love and charity towards each other.
Page 534 - States providing for the election of United States senators by a direct vote of the people, and that we urge our senators and representative to use their best endeavors to secure such amendment.
Page 553 - It has proposed an amendment to the federal constitution providing for the election of United States senators by the direct vote of the people.
Page 123 - Resolved, that it is both the part of patriotism and of duty to recognize no political principles other than the CONSTITUTION OF THE COUNTRY, THE UNION OF THE STATES, AND THE ENFORCEMENT OF THE LAWS...
Page 54 - ... the vital principle of republics from which there is no appeal but to force, the vital principle and immediate parent of despotism; a well-disciplined militia, our best reliance in peace and for the first moments of war till regulars may relieve them; the supremacy of the civil over the military authority; economy in the public...
Page 103 - March 6, 1820,) which, being inconsistent with the principle of non-intervention by Congress with slavery in the States and Territories as recognized by the legislation of 1850, commonly called the Compromise Measures is hereby declared inoperative and void...
Page 587 - Transportation being a means of exchange and a public necessity, the government should own and operate the railroads in the interest of the people.
Page 587 - We demand a national currency, safe, sound and flexible, issued by the general government, only, a full legal tender for all debts...
Page 118 - That one of the necessities of the age, in a military, commercial, and postal point of view, is speedy communication between the Atlantic and Pacific states; and the Democratic party pledge such constitutional government aid as will insure the construction of a railroad to the Pacific coast at the earliest practicable period.

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