The Geography of Marriage: Or, Legal Perplexities of Wedlock in the United States (Google eBook)

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G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1889 - Marriage law - 334 pages
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Page 281 - A person who by force, menace, or duress compels a woman against her will to marry him, or to marry any other person, or to be defiled, is punishable by imprisonment for not less than three nor more than ten years, or by a fine of not more than $1,000, or by both.
Page 289 - A person of pure white blood who intermarries with any negro, or person having a distinct and visible admixture of African blood, and any negro or person having a distinct and visible admixture of African blood who intermarries with any person of pure white blood, shall be fined not more than $100, or imprisoned not more than three months, or both.
Page 281 - takes or detains a woman unlawfully against her will, with the intent to compel her by force, menace, or duress to marry him, or to marry any other person, or to be defiled, is guilty of abduction, and punishable by imprisonment for not more than
Page 267 - NEVADA. Every person who shall take any woman unlawfully, against her will, and by force, menace, or duress compel her to marry him or to marry any other person or to be defiled, on conviction shall be imprisoned not less than
Page 110 - do you take this man to be your wedded husband, to have and to hold from this day forward, for better for worse, for richer, for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, till death do
Page 269 - In the solemnization of marriage no particular form shall be required, except that the parties shall declare in the presence of the judge, minister, or magistrate, and the attending witnesses, that they take each other as husband and wife ; and in every case there shall be at least two witnesses present
Page 224 - between parents and children, including grandparents and grandchildren of every degree, between brothers and sisters of the half as well as of the whole blood, and between uncles and nieces, aunts and nephews, and between cousins of the first degree, are declared to be incestuous and void.
Page 64 - Othello, speak :— Did you, by indirect and forced courses, Subdue and poison this young maid's affections? Or came it by request, and such fair question As soul to soul affordeth
Page 101 - What a delicious breath marriage sends forth ; The violet bed 's not sweeter. Honest wedlock Is like a banqueting house, built in a garden, On which the Spring's chaste flowers take delight To cast their modest odors. MIDDLETON.
Page 301 - Bigamy.—Whoever, being married, and whose husband or wife has not remained continually for seven years beyond the sea, or continually absented himself or herself the one from the other for the space of seven years together, the one of them not knowing the other to be living within that time, or who were not married before the age of consent, or

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