Structural and Systematic Conchology: An Introduction to the Study of the Mollusca .. (Google eBook)

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The Author, 1882 - Mollusks
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Page ii - Which strike ev'n eyes incurious ; but each moss, Each shell, each crawling insect, holds a rank Important in the plan of Him who framed This scale of beings ; holds a rank which lost Would break the chain, and leave behind a gap Which Nature's self would rue.
Page 34 - July 28, engaged in capturing and devouring the young mackerel, which were swimming about in " schools," and at that time were about four or five inches long. In attacking the mackerel they would suddenly dart backward among the fish with the velocity of an arrow, and as suddenly turn obliquely to the right or left and seize a fish, which was almost instantly killed by a bite in the back of the neck with the sharp beaks. The bite was always made in the same place, cutting out a triangular piece of...
Page 115 - Since the introduction of blankets by the Hudson's Bay Company, the use of these shells as a medium of purchase has to a great extent died out, the blankets having become the money, as it were, or the means by which everything is now reckoned and paid for by the savage. A. slave, a canoe, or a squaw is worth in these days so many blankets ; but it used to be so many strings of Dentalia...
Page 60 - Shells are at once the attraction of the untutored savage, the delight of the refined artist, the wonder of the philosophic zoologist, and the most valued treasures of the geologist. They adorn the sands of seagirt isles and continents now; and they form the earliest "footprints of the sands of time
Page 341 - Ventral valve with a false area, which is sometimes minute and usually grooved for the passage of the peduncle. Dorsal valve either with or without an area. Muscular impressions in the ventral valve four ; one pair in front of the beak near the middle or in the upper half of the shell, and the others situated one on each side near the cardinal edge. Shell calcareous ; surface concentrically striated, sometimes with thin extended lamellose ridges.
Page 321 - Etymology, diminutive of всшш, slit. Type, S. crispata, PI. X., Fig. 23. Synonyms, Anatomus, Montfort ; Woodwardia, Fischer. Shell minute, thin, not pearly ; body-whorl large ; spire small; surface striated; aperture rounded, with a slit in the margin of the outer lip ; operculate. The young have no slit. Animal like Margarita ; tentacles long, pectinated, with the eyes at their base ; foot with two pointed lappets and two long slender pectinated cirri on each side ; operculum ovate, very thin,...
Page 127 - In these, the yelk undergoes partial division, and the blastoderm, formed upon one face of it by the smaller blastomeres, spreads gradually over the whole ovum, enclosing the larger and more slowly dividing blastomeres. The mantle makes its appearance as an elevated patch in the centre of the blastoderm, while the future arms appear as symmetrically disposed elevations of the periphery,, on each side of the mantle. Between these and the edge of the mantle, two longitudinal ridges mark the rudiments...
Page 37 - It will 1* seen from the above that the study of the species of multilocular shells is encompassed with great difficulties, owing to the variability of their characters ; in fact the synonymy of the species of Ammonites has been greatly increased in consequence of several names being given to the same species at different periods of its growth. The living Nautilus also, undergoes a change of form. At a recent meeting of the Boston Society of Natural History, Prof...
Page 271 - ' consisted of a bag of bunting (used for flags) 2 feet deep, the mouth of which was sewn round a wooden hoop 14 inches in diameter ; three pieces of cord, lj foot long, wore secured to the hoop at equal intervals and had their ends tied together. When in use,- the net was towed astern, clear of the ship's wake, by a stout cord secured to one of the quarter-boats, or held in the hand. The scope of the line required was regulated by the speed of the vessel at the time, and the amount of strain caused...
Page 146 - Pickering) ; and M. Caillaud carried some from Egypt to Paris packed in saw-dust. Indeed, it is not easy to ascertain the limit of their endurance ; for Mr. Laidlay having placed a number in a drawer for this purpose, found them alive after five years, although in the warm climate of Calcutta.

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