Woman in the nineteenth century (Google eBook)

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Page 45 - Countrymen, My heart doth joy that yet, in all my life, I found no man but he was true to me. I shall have glory by this losing day, More than Octavius and Mark Antony By this vile conquest shall attain unto. So fare you well at once; for Brutus...
Page 35 - I meant the day-star should not brighter rise, Nor lend like influence from his lucent seat. I meant she should be courteous, facile, sweet, Hating that solemn vice of greatness, pride ; I meant each softest virtue there should meet, Fit in that softer bosom to reside. Only a learned and a manly soul I purposed her, that should, with even powers, The rock, the spindle, and the shears control Of destiny, and spin her own free hours.
Page 45 - You are my true and honourable wife ; As dear to me as are the ruddy drops That visit my sad heart.
Page 43 - OH that those lips had language ! Life has passed With me but roughly since I heard thee last. Those lips are thine thy own sweet smile I see, The same that oft in childhood solaced me; Voice only fails, else how distinct they say, 'Grieve not, my child, chase all thy fears away!
Page 45 - I should know no secrets That appertain to you ? Am I yourself But, as it were, in sort or limitation, To keep with you at meals, comfort your bed, And talk to you sometimes? Dwell I but in the suburbs Of your good pleasure ? If it be no more, 286 Portia is Brutus
Page 176 - Vergine, que' begli occhi Che vider tristi la spietata stampa Ne' dolci membri del tuo caro figlio, Volgi al mio dnbbio stato; Che sconsigliato a te vien per consiglio. Vergine pura, d'ogni parte intera, Del tuo parto gentil figliuola e madre...
Page 36 - ... be described, and I feel so sure that persistence and courage are the most womanly no less than the most manly qualities, that I would exchange these words for others of a larger sense, at the risk of marring the fine tissue of the verse. Read, 'A heavenward and instructed soul,' and I should be satisfied. Let it not be said, wherever there is energy or creative genius, 'She has a masculine mind.
Page 160 - In the earlier tract I was told I did not make my meaning sufficiently clear. In this I have consequently tried to illustrate it in various ways, and may have been guilty of much repetition. Yet, as I am anxious to leave no room for doubt, I shall venture to retrace, once more, the scope of my design in points, as was done in old-fashioned sermons. Man is a being of two-fold relations, to nature beneath, and intelligences above him. The earth is his school, if not his birth-place; God his object;...
Page 158 - ... would not speak in vain; whether each in her own home or banded in unison. Tell these men that you will not accept the glittering baubles, spacious dwellings, and plentiful service they mean to offer you through these means. Tell them that the heart of Woman demands nobleness and honor in Man, and that if they have not purity, have not mercy, they are no longer fathers, lovers, husbands, sons of yours.
Page 204 - Father, I to thee Am present; for my country, and for all The land of Greece, I freely give myself A victim: to the altar let them lead me, Since such the oracle. If aught on me Depends, be happy, and obtain the prize Of glorious conquest, and revisit safe Your country.

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