Transactions of the Academy of Science of Saint Louis, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Academy of Science of St. Louis, 1868 - Science
0 Reviews
Vol. 1-22 include the Academy's proceedings, which are separately paged in v. 3-22, with varying titles: 1-2: Journal of proceedings; v.3-6, Proceedings; v. 7-22, Record.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 302 - Of absolute rest Nature gives us no evidence : all matter, as far as we can ascertain, is ever in movement, not merely in masses, as with the planetary spheres, but also molecularly, or throughout its most intimate structure : thus every alteration of temperature produces a molecular change throughout the whole substance heated or cooled ; slow chemical or electrical actions, actions of light or invisible radiant forces, are always at play, so that as a fact we cannot predicate of any portion of...
Page 302 - Are not gross bodies and light convertible into one another, and may not bodies receive much of their activity from th'e particles of light which enter their composition ? * * * The changing of bodies into light and light into bodies is very conformable to the course of nature, which seems delighted with transmutations.
Page 340 - Notice of some New Species of Fossils from a locality of the Niagara Group in Indiana ; with a List of Identified Species from the Same Place.
Page 140 - The Texan strata consist of calcareous and siliceous sandstones, and white, pinkish, and grayish siliceous and calcareous marls. The calcareous beds are often almost wholly composed of finely comminuted and water-worn shells, chiefly derived from the destruction of the Cretaceous strata, and in places abound in fossil bones and plants, usually in a fine state of preservation.
Page 165 - Ehrenberg's genus and ought to bear the name ampelicida. It makes its appearance only on nearly full grown berries, exhibiting in the first stage a discolored spot on the side, but never at the base of the berry, about two lines in diameter, with a dark spot in the centre. This spot soon becomes light brown and remains so, while the surrounding part of the berry gets darker and exhibits a rough or (under the magnifier) pustulous surface ; gradually, now, the berry shrivels up and turns black.
Page 205 - ... color; that of younger branches smooth, with many large vesicles, containing a clear fluid balsam, which remains between the layers of the old bark.
Page 165 - It makes its appearance only on nearly full-grown berries, exhibiting in the first stage a discolored spot on the side, but never at the base, of the berry, about two lines in diameter, with a dark spot in the centre. This spot soon becomes light brown, and remains so; while the surrounding part of the berry gets darker, and exhibits a rough or (under the magnifier) pustulous surface : gradually now the berry shrivels up, and becomes black. The individual fungi are little spherical bodies...
Page 558 - Be it further resolved that the Secretary be instructed to send a copy of this resolution to the President of the United States. The...
Page 14 - ... remarkable fact which has been established, that the magnetic force is greater in both the northern and southern hemispheres in the months of December, January, and February, when the sun is nearest to the earth, than in those of May, June, and July, when he is most distant from it : whereas if the effect were due to temperature, the two hemispheres should be oppositely instead of similarly affected in each of the two periods referred to.
Page 503 - No other satisfactory method of exploration, except along the course of the river, could be adopted to determine its actual course, and peculiar natural features, and James White, as the pioneer of this enterprise, will probably retain the honor of being the only man who has traversed, through its whole course, the Great Canon of the Colorado, and lived to recount his observations on this perilous voyage.

Bibliographic information