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Information for publishers and authors about the Library Project

Help users find your books — even your deep, deep backlist
We're working with several major libraries to include their collections in Google Books and, like a card catalog, show users information about the book plus a few snippets – a few sentences of their search term in context. They'll also see 'Buy this Book' links that lead directly to online bookstores where they can buy the book.

Put a book into the Samples Pages View without sending us a copy of the book
There's no need to send us a copy or upload the PDF; just let us know which books you'd like added to your Google Books account. Then users will be able to view samples pages of the book and you will be able to get the top 'Buy this Book' link and drive traffic back to your website. Even if you don't sell direct and the book is out of print, you can still earn revenue from contextual advertising. Learn more here.

Collect market research for older titles — for free
By upgrading a Snippet View book into the Sample Pages View, you can track the number of people who look at the pages and click the 'Buy this book' links. If you're thinking about bringing a book back into print, Google Books can give you unique real-world insight into its popularity.

Don't want a Snippet View of your book in Google Books?
Learn how to exclude it.

For general questions about the Library Project, see Library Project – Common Questions.

Publisher Options

  1. How do I upgrade a Snippet View book into the Partner Program?
  2. I've submitted my books through the Partner Program, will you still scan them at a library?
  3. What about books that I don't want in Google Books at all?
  4. What if I find one of my books in Google Books and would like it removed?
  5. What happens if I do nothing?
  6. What about books that I'm going to publish later this year or the next?

Policy Questions

  1. How do you determine if a book is in the public domain?
  2. Does scanning comply with copyright law?
  3. Do the libraries get a copy of the book?
  4. Can I see a copy of the contracts you have with libraries?

Publisher Options

  1. How do I upgrade a Snippet View book into the Partner Program?

    If you're already a Google Books partner, you just need to tell us what books you'd like to add by including them on your book list. Once we find a book at a library that you've listed, instead of users seeing the Snippet View, they will see the Sample Pages View with links back to your website and your logo. The book will also appear in your Google Books account where you can view reports on how many users are viewing the book.

  2. I submitted my books through the Google Books Partner Program, will you still scan them at a library?

    We might, unless you let us know that you'd prefer us not to. If a publisher or author has provided a book through the Partner Program and we scan the same ISBN from a library, the publisher's version of the book will be displayed. However, the library will get a digital copy of the book as a part of their collection. Learn more here. If you want us to avoid scanning your books through the Library Project, just check the box in your Google Books account. Learn how to set this up here.

  3. What about books that I don't want in Google Books at all?

    If you are a current Google Books partner, you can simply upload a list of your books that you don't want scanned through the Library Project. Just login to your account and follow the instructions here. That tells us which books to avoid when scanning.

    If you're not a Google Books partner and want us to avoid your books, you'll need to provide us with a small amount of information about yourself as well as a list of the books you don't want in Google Books. Unless you specify otherwise, we'll use your information only to verify that you are indeed the owner of that particular book. Please see our privacy policy for more details. To begin this process, please start here to identify yourself as the owner.

    If you're having trouble coming up with your list or have questions or just need help, please send us an email. We'd be happy to help you.
     

  4. What if I find one of my books in Google Books and would like it removed?

    We're happy to remove your book from our search results at any time, just as we do for website publishers. You'll need to go through the same process as described in the previous question, identifying yourself as the owner and letting us know which books to exclude. However, to let us know that the book is already searchable on Google Books, please also send an email or contact your account manager.
     
  5. What happens if I do nothing?

    Users will see the Snippet View which, like a card catalog, shows information about the book plus a few snippets - a few sentences of your search term in context. This view includes links to purchase the book, but will not include a link directly to your website or any additional branding. There are no advertisements on these pages.
     
  6. What about books that I'm going to publish later this year or the next?

    We will only scan a book starting a year from when it was published to give you time to submit the book yourself through the Partner Program or to let us know that you do not want it scanned through the Library Project.

Policy Questions

  1. How do you determine if a book is in the public domain?

    Whether a book is in the public domain is a complex legal determination; how we treat books published at different times is less complex. For users in the United States, Google Books treats all books published after 1922 as protected by copyright, except for books to which no copyright was attached in the first instance, such as books authored by the U.S. Government. For the books we treat as in copyright, we show at most the bibliographic information and short snippets of text. For users outside of the United States, we'll make determinations based on appropriate local law. As with all of our decisions related to the Google Books content, our plan is to be conservative in our reading of both copyright law and the known facts surrounding a particular book.

  2. Does scanning comply with copyright law?

    Yes. The use Google makes is fully consistent with both the history of fair use under copyright law, and also all the principles underlying copyright law itself. Copyright law has always been about ensuring that authors will continue to write books and publishers continue to sell them.  By making books easier to find, buy, and borrow from libraries, Google Books helps increase the incentives for authors to write and publishers to sell books.  To achieve that goal, we need to make copies of books, but these copies are permitted under copyright law.

    This project is very similar to web search. In order to electronically index a webpage, you need to make a copy of it. In order to electronically index a book, we have to make a digital copy of the book. As with web search, the copies we make are used to direct people to the books.

  3. Do the libraries get a copy of the book?

    Yes. Each library will receive a digital copy of every book we scan at their specific library. Each library will treat their copies in accordance with copyright law.

  4. Can I see a copy of the contracts you have with libraries?

    Yes. There has been a lot of interest in the Google Books Library Project from publishers, librarians and authors as well as the general public. The University of Michigan has publicly displayed its contract, which shows the full scope of its work with Google. We believe this will foster more open communications with the industry and the public so that everyone can better understand Michigan 's involvement with the Google Books Library Project. Contracts can be difficult to interpret, so please let us know if you have questions or concerns about what it says. We hope that the information above addresses all the questions you may have, but feel free to send additional questions at any time. Please visit our Library Partner page for information from each library and links to their own websites.

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