Éméric Crucé

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Allen, Lane, & Scott, 1899 - Arbitration (International law). - 69 pages
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Page 11 - And He shall judge among the nations, and shall rebuke many people; and they shall beat their swords into plow-shares, and their spears into pruning-hooks: nation shall not lift up sword against nation, neither shall they learn war any more.
Page 11 - And He shall judge among many people, and rebuke strong nations afar off; and they shall beat their swords into plow-shares, and their spears into pruning-hooks: nation shall not lift up a sword against nation, neither shall they learn war any more." And a little later the prophet Isaiah said:—
Page 57 - and so fondly cherished by Grotius, of the good time, a good time to be won only by toil and unremitting efforts,— '' When the war-drums throbbed no longer, and the battle flags were furl'd, In the Parliament of man, in the Federation of the World.
Page 11 - into pruning-hooks: nation shall not lift up a sword against nation, neither shall they learn war any more." And a little later the prophet Isaiah said:—
Page 9 - a citizen of the great republic of humanity at large, I cannot avoid reflecting with pleasure on the probable influence that commerce may hereafter have on human manners and society in general. On these occasions I consider how mankind may be connected like one great family in
Page 9 - more humanized in their policy, and in fine that the period is not very remote when the benefits of a liberal and free commerce will pretty generally succeed to the devastations and horrors of war.
Page 33 - perpetually their ambassadors, in order that the differences that might arise should be settled by the judgment of the whole assembly. The ambassadors of those who would be interested would plead there the grievances of their masters and the other deputies would judge them without prejudice (passion). And to give more authority to the judgment,
Page 24 - This book would gladly make the tour of the inhabited world, so as to be seen by all the Kings, and it would not fear any disgrace, having truth for its escort, and the merit of the subject which must serve as letters of recommendation and credence.
Page 9 - I indulge a fond, perhaps, an enthusiastic idea, that, as the world is evidently much less barbarous than it has been, its melioration must
Page 39 - The gates that steel exclude, resistless eloquence shall enter.' This made Pyrrhus say, ' That Cineas had gained him more cities by his address, than he had won by his arms' ; and he continued to heap honors and employments upon him. Cineas now

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