Fat China: How Expanding Waistlines are Changing a Nation

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Anthem Press, 2010 - Social Science - 224 pages
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China's economy has boomed, but a potentially disastrous side effect - along with pollution and a growing income gap between urban and rural regions - is the effects obesity will have on the country's fragile healthcare system. Today's overweight in China can look to a mixed future of bright economic hopes for their country, and poor and deteriorating health for themselves. From a situation 20 years ago when diets were limited by food availability, and famine was still a recent memory, China's urban centres have seen alarmingly rising rates of obesity. Throughout the country an estimated 200 million people out of a total population of around 1.3 billion were overweight (over 15%).

Why is this issue so important? Taking into account that the recent period of stable world economic growth has in large part been driven by the availability of cheap labour in China, which produces much of the goods that keep the retail tills ringing elsewhere in the world, the issue of China's rising obesity is an issue of potentially global economic significance. Consider a scenario just a few years down the line, where there are so many overweight urban Chinese, suffering from obesity-related illness, that the government, in order to pay for increased healthcare treatments, has to raise the levels of income and other tax to pay for this huge and continual expense.

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Contents

China Gets on the Scales
1
BMI The Maths
2
Chinas ProsperityInduced Waistline Timeline
15
Chinas Fat Class
17
Chinas Growing Service Sector 19802008
21
A Wealthier China Growth of Average Salaries per Workforce Sector in China 19972008
22
Fat City Obesity and Urbanisation
29
Chinas Cities Ranked by Per Capita Food Sales 2008
31
Supermarket Sweep
91
Chinas Leading Supermarket Retailers 2009
92
Comparison of Chinas Ten Leading ForeignInvested Grocery Chains 20042009
94
Problems of Distribution 4 Changing
99
Fast Fat The Impact
105
Chinas Fast TakeUp of Fast Food 19972006
107
TV and Print Ad Spend by Brand for Shanghai 2008
111
McDonalds Beefing Up 1 10
115

Populations of Selected Major Developing Suburbs in China 2010
39
Two Comparative Estimates of the Total Size and Shape of Consuming China 2008
42
MegaWok Chinas Diet
45
Total Volume Growth in Retail Sales of Selected Food Products in China 20032009
50
The National Meat
51
Fruit and Vegetables 4 More Choice More Availability
57
Per Capita Food Commodity Consumption and 00 Growth 19992008
59
Per Capita Food Commodity Retail Sales 00 Share of Throat and 00 NonRetail Sales 19992008
60
1 Total Production of Processed Foods Containing Significant Amounts of Added Sugar in China JanuaryiNovember 20062007
61
Per Capita Sugar Retail Sales and Consumption
62
Salt Goitres Down Blood Pressure Up
63
Volume and Value 20012007
66
Growth in the Total Market Value and Volume for Alcoholic Drinks by Sector 20032009
67
Soft Drinks Fizzy China
69
Going Green Maybe
78
Busier Lifestyles 4 Changing the Way People Act
85
The Growth of Organized Retailing in China 20002015
88
A Plethora of FastFood Choices
121
Selling Fat Promoting Fat in China
129
Ad Spend on Food Health Food and Alcoholic Drinks
133
Little Fat Emperors Obesity Among
139
Hong Kong Offers an Example
146
Its Tough Being a Kid
154
Asian Women Considering Cosmetic Surgery
158
Chinas Fat Clinic The Impact
173
The Dilemma of Reform Between
179
China Medical Insurance Coverage 200342008
183
The Core Conditions
187
Take the Evidence and Multiply That by China
194
Projected Costs of Obesity to Chinas Healthcare System
197
Beijing and Big Pharma
201
The Future of Fat China Victims
207
Acknowledgements
217
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Paul French is a founder and the Chief China Representative of Access Asia based in Shanghai. Access Asia specializes in providing information on China's economy and consumer/retail markets. He is the author of a number of books on China's history, development and current society.

As co-founder of Access Asia, Matthew Crabbe has been analysing the consumer economy of China for almost two decades. He has specialist knowledge about the development of China's consumer lifestyles, and the repercussions that such fast change has for Chinese people and society.

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