1000 Ideas for Creative Reuse: Remake, Restyle, Recycle, Renew

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Quarry Books, Nov 1, 2009 - Crafts & Hobbies - 320 pages
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DIVArtists and crafters have always been recyclers, but for many, it has not only become a thrifty choice, it has become a moral imperative. 1000 Ideas for Creative Reuse contains a cutting edge collection of the most inventive work being made with re-used, upcycled, and already existing materials. The work in this book ranges from clever and humble personal accessories to unique and important large-scale works of art, including paper art, fashion, jewelry, housewares, interiors, and installations./div
 

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Contents

Title
Dedication
Contents
Introduction
Chapter 1 PAPER COLLAGE + ASSEMBLAGE
Chapter 2 COUTURE + SOFT GOODS
Chapter 3 JEWELRY + ADORNMENTS
Chapter 4 GEEK CRAFT + MAN CRAFT
Chapter 5 HOUSEWARES + FURNISHINGS
Chapter 6 ART INTERIORS + INSTALLATIONS
Resources
Directory of contributors
Acknowledgments
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Garth Johnson is a studio artist, writer and educator who lives in Eureka, California. In addition to maintaining the website "Exteme Craft" (www.extremecraft.com) Garth writes for CRAFT magazine and his writing has been featured in museum catalogs, magazines, and books worldwide, including a contribution to the upcoming book Handmade Nation from Princeton Architectural Press. His first DVD, ReVision: Recycled Crafts for Earth-Friendly Living will be released by Eyekiss Films later this year. His artwork was featured in a solo show at Gallerie Maxim in Cologne, Germany in August, 2008. Garth received a BFA from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and an MFA from Alfred University. He has taught at Georgia State University, Columbus State University and is currently a full-time instructor at College of the Redwoods in Eureka, CA. In addition to teaching, he is a sought-after lecturer and visiting artist, with recent lectures at Ohio State University, Illinois State University, and the Kansas City Art Institute.

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