1000 Things Worth Knowing: That All who Read May Know

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., 2004 - Reference - 205 pages
0 Reviews
This handy book of useful information contains more than 1000 facts, many of which are not generally known to the average person; but all of them are of interest to humankind, and knowledge of many of them is essential.Fowler has used the simplest English, and has avoided, as far as possible, all technical terms. He has endeavored not to fall into the common error of making his explanations harder to understand than the subjects treated.In the space of a few hundred pages Fowler has presented the thousand or more things that are really worth knowing. He examines everything from April Fool's Day ("Its origin is unknown, but it is supposed to follow an ancient pageant custom of playing tricks on the first day of April"), to the Seven Wonders of the ancient and new worlds, to the derivation of the term "Yankee."The book is not a mere encyclopedia -- it is an education unto itself.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
17
Section 3
18
Section 4
39
Section 5
48
Section 6
59
Section 7
62
Section 8
63
Section 18
116
Section 19
121
Section 20
124
Section 21
126
Section 22
128
Section 23
132
Section 24
138
Section 25
143

Section 9
65
Section 10
74
Section 11
75
Section 12
86
Section 13
97
Section 14
99
Section 15
101
Section 16
109
Section 17
113
Section 26
154
Section 27
155
Section 28
156
Section 29
161
Section 30
191
Section 31
192
Section 32
194
Section 33
199
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 19 - Freedom, which is 19 feet 6 inches high and weighs 14,985 pounds. It was modeled by Crawford. The height of the dome above the base line of the east front is 287 feet 5 inches.
Page 19 - The dome of the original central building was constructed of wood, covered with copper. This was replaced in 1856 by the present structure of cast iron. It was completed in 1865. The entire weight of iron used is 8,909,200 pounds. The dome is crowned by a bronze statue of Freedom, which is 19 feet 6 inches high and weighs 14,985 pounds.
Page 19 - DOME. The Dome of the original central building was constructed of wood, covered with copper. This was replaced in 1856 by the present structure of cast iron. It was completed in 1865.

Bibliographic information