100 Crooked Little Crime Stories

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Sterling Publishing Company, Incorporated, 2004 - Fiction - 608 pages
2 Reviews
From the puzzle tale in Alexandre Dumas’s “The Man of the Knife” to Gerald Tollesfrud’s police procedural “Switch,” this richly varied collection spans more than 200 years and encompasses virtually every kind of crime story. Ernest Leong’s “Incense Sticks” offers a taste of the noir thriller. Allen Beack’s “Always Together” features dark, bloody fratricide. Ferenc Molnar’s “The Best Policy” tells a fascinating tale of embezzlement, while Gary Lovisi’s “New Blood” stars a compelling serial killer. There’s kidnapping in Edgar Wallace’s “The Slavemaker,” bigamy in Joyce Kilmer’s “Whitemail,” drive-by shootings in Dane Gregory’s “Jackie Won’t Be Home,” and a crime so bizarre in Geoggrey Vace’s “The Hard-Luck Kid” that it simply defies classification. Each one will get the blood racing and the mind working in overdrive.

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User Review  - callmejacx - LibraryThing

This is a collection of short crime stories. Most of the stories were humourous and a surprise twist at the end. I found it hard to put down, telling myself, "only one more story". It was usually a lot more than just "one more". Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - LeeHallison - LibraryThing

A fun collection of short stories - mostly about crimes, mysteries or horrible happenings. These are all old, and the plots are clever - even when we've heard them before (these are usually the ... Read full review

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About the author (2004)

Martin H. Greenberg was born in 1942. He received a doctorate in Political Science in 1969 and was a professor of political science at the University of Wisconsin until 1995. Over the course of his long and prolific career, Greenberg has published around 1000 anthologies and has worked with numerous best-selling authors including Isaac Asimov, Tom Clancy, Stephen King, Anne McCaffrey, Sue Grafton, Scott Turow and Dean Koontz. He has won numerous awards including the Horror Guild Award in 1994, the Deathrealm Award in 1996, the Bram Stoker Award in 1998, and the Prometheus Special Award in 2005. He also received The Ellery Queen Award for lifetime achievement in mystery editing and the Milford Award for lifetime achievement in science fiction editing.

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