100 Ghastly Little Ghost Stories

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Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Martin Harry Greenberg, Robert A. Weinberg
Sterling Publishing Company, Incorporated, 2003 - Fiction - 560 pages
1 Review
Be afraid, be very afraid: really scary things can come in small packages, and these 100 frightening little tales offer big chills and thrills. They represent more than 150 year's worth of writing, and include the greats: H.P. Lovecraft ("The Terrible Old Man"), Ambrose Bierce ("The Stranger"), Lafcadio Hearn ("A Dead Secret"), Oscar Wilde ("The Sphinx Without a Secret"), and J. Sheridan Le Fanu ("The Ghost and the Bone-Setter"). Best of all, a variety of human emotions and behavior come to the fore, from avarice (August Derleth's "Pacific 421") to revenge (Thorp McCluskey's "Black Gold"), from jealousy (Steve Rasnic Tem's "Daddy") to honor (Edith Nesbit's "John Charrington's Wedding") to love (Darrell Schwietzer's "Clocks"). Using a minimum of elements, each ghost story in this collection will entertain, captivate, and evoke a powerful response in readers.
So be warned: you might not want to read these while you're all alone in the house...

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User Review  - Scaryguy - LibraryThing

Wonderful stories! A staple of any library! Read full review

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About the author (2003)

Martin H. Greenberg was born in 1942. He received a doctorate in Political Science in 1969 and was a professor of political science at the University of Wisconsin until 1995. Over the course of his long and prolific career, Greenberg has published around 1000 anthologies and has worked with numerous best-selling authors including Isaac Asimov, Tom Clancy, Stephen King, Anne McCaffrey, Sue Grafton, Scott Turow and Dean Koontz. He has won numerous awards including the Horror Guild Award in 1994, the Deathrealm Award in 1996, the Bram Stoker Award in 1998, and the Prometheus Special Award in 2005. He also received The Ellery Queen Award for lifetime achievement in mystery editing and the Milford Award for lifetime achievement in science fiction editing.

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