100 Maps: The Science, Art and Politics of Cartography Throughout History

Front Cover
John Owen Edward Clark
Sterling Publishing Company, Inc., 2005 - Science - 256 pages
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From Ptolemy's projection of the world--still the basic map after 13 centuries--to Tolkien's cartography of Middle Earth (the most printed guide to a non-existent place ever), each of these maps has its own fascinating story to tell.

Escape maps, military maps, cartographic breakthroughs, and follies and forgeries: these 100 maps, organized chronologically, are the most important, dramatic, and breathtakingly beautiful ever created. They show not only the art and science of the form, but also its power. Some had devastating consequences, such the 1885 map of Africa that carved up the continent to Europeans desires. But others are simply exquisite to look at or mysterious, like the Aborginal "Dreamtime" painting and the Siberian rock maps. And some maps capture places that exist only in the imagination. Finding out about each one is an adventure all its own, whether it be with Lewis and Clark across America or the British as they uncovered India.
 

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100 Maps : The Science, Art and Politics of Cartography Throughout History

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This handsome collection of antique and modern maps beautifully reproduced in full color presents a history of cartography written specifically for the nonexpert. Encyclopedist Clark, who authored the ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction by Professor Jeremy Black
6
The Choice of Maps
14
CARTOGRAPHIC BREAKTHROUGHS
37
MILITARY MAPS
151
DRAWING THE LINE
191
Bibliography 8c Websites
253
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