100 Years of Western Wear

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Gibbs Smith, 1993 - Antiques & Collectibles - 159 pages
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From Nashville to New York City, western wear has endured and continues to ride the trail through all arenas of the fashion world. Tyler Beard examines how function inspired cowboys, cowgirls, and their little buckaroos and buckarettes wore out West and East from 1890 to the 1990s.

In 125 dazzling color photographs, 45 black-and-white pictures, and lively commentary, 100 Years of Western Wear shows the best of men's, women's and children's:

Hats

Chaps

Cuffs

Spurs

Jewelry

Ties

Suits

Embroidered Shirts

Work Wear

Rodeo Wear

Stage Wear

Bandanas

Belts

Buckles

Boots

Rhinestone Suits

 

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Great source for researching Western Wear

Contents

II
16
III
30
IV
112
V
125
VI
151
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Page 9 - BEGINS Out where the handclasp's a little stronger, Out where the smile dwells a little longer, That's where the West begins; Out where the sun is a little brighter, Where the snows that fall are a trifle whiter; Where the bonds of home are a wee bit tighter...
Page 9 - Out where the world is in the making, Where fewer hearts with despair are aching, That's where the West begins ; Where there's more of singing and less of sighing, Where there's more of giving and less of buying, And a man makes friends without half trying, That's where the West begins.
Page 11 - The officers were dressed in the costume which we found prevailed through the country,— broad-brimmed hat, usually of a black or dark brown color, with a gilt or figured band round the crown, and lined under the rim with silk; a short jacket of silk, or figured calico (the European skirted bodycoat is never worn ) ; the shirt open in the neck; rich waistcoat, if any; pantaloons open at the sides below the knee, laced with gilt, usually of velveteen or broadcloth; or else...
Page 9 - Where there's laughter in every streamlet flowing, Where there's more of reaping and less of sowing, That's where the West begins; Out where the world is in the making, Where fewer hearts with despair are aching; That's where the West begins; Where...
Page 9 - Where there is laughter in every streamlet flowing, Where there's more of reaping and less of sowing, That's where the West begins. Out where the world is in the making, Where fewer hearts with despair are aching; That's where the West begins.
Page 12 - 77. The John B. Stetson hat with a deeper crown and not so broad a rim, and the ten-ounce hat took the cake. Up to this date, the high-heeled boots were the rage, and when it was possible to have them, the heel was made to start under the foot, for what reason I never knew, unless it was the same motive that prompts the girls to wear the opera heel in order to make a small track, thus leaving the impression that a number ten was only a six, this I am guessing at and will leave it open for the reader...
Page 11 - They wear the deer-skin shoe, which is of a dark brown color, and (being made by Indians) usually a good deal ornamented. They have no suspenders, but always wear a sash round the waist, which is generally red, and varying in quality with the means of the wearer. Add to this the never-failing cloak, and you have the dress of the Californian. This last garment, the cloak, is always a mark of the rank and wealth of the owner. The "gente de razon...
Page 11 - ... said— and not without some foundation— that a Texan could take a butcher knife and rawhide and make a steamboat, of course he could not have made the boiler, but when it came to the top part he would have been at home. One thing certain, if the thing had broken to pieces, he could have tied it up. During the war his clothing was made from home-spun cloth, he had no other, home-made shoes or boots, even his hat was homemade, the favorite hat material being straw. Rye straw was the best. Sometimes...

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About the author (1993)

Tyler Beard is the foremost expert on cowboy boots. He is the author of Art of the Boot, The Cowboy Boot Book, and 100 Years of Western Wear. He lives on a ranch with his wife, and together they run True West Design.

Jim Arndt is the author of How to Be a Cowboy and coauthor with Mary Emmerling of Art of the Cross, Art of Turquoise, Art of the Skull and Art of the Heart. He coauthored several Cowboy Boot books. He lives in Santa Fe.

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