100 Years of Theosophy: A History of the Theosophical Society in America

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Theosophical Publishing House, 1987 - Religion - 215 pages
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The colorful history of the Theosophical Society in America. Although Helena P. Blavatsky and Henry S. Olcott founded the Theosophical Society in New York in 1875, they left the country in 1878 for India, where they established the international headquarters. It might seem that the three short years would not be long enough to establish firm roots here, yet by 1886 there were 14 branches in cities as far flung as St. Louis, Boston, Los Angeles, and San Francisco. The American Section was formally chartered in 1886, and this book was published in 1987 -- a century as full of events and change for the Society as for the country itself.

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Contents

Conflict and Resolution18911895
12
A New Beginning18951912
31
Finding Direction and Identity19121920
47
Copyright

5 other sections not shown

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About the author (1987)

Joy Mills, a teacher by profession, has devoted most of her adult life to the work of The Theosophical Society. Joining the society in 1940, she has served in a number of capacities, including that of National President of both the American and Australian Sections of the society, as well as International Vice-President. Her lecture tours have taken her to more than 50 countries and society branches. She has published several books, including a history of the American section, 100 Years of Theosophy, and her writings have been published in theosophical journals throughout the world. Mills holds a bachelors degree from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and a master's in English Literature from the University of Chicago. She engaged in further post-graduate studies in American History at the University of Washington. During a seven-year period, she was a high school teacher in the Seattle Public Schools system. Elected to the office of National President of the Theosophical Society in America in 1965, the first woman to serve in that capacity, Mills was re-elected for three successive terms. During that period, she founded Quest Books as well as a number of other programs supported by grants from the Kern Foundation. Resigning office in 1974, when she was appointed the society's international vice-president, Mills took up residence at the world headquarters in Chennai, India, continuing to tour and lecture throughout the world. Returning to the States in 1980, Mills became Director of the Krotona Institute School of Theosophy, greatly expanding its educational and training programs. Called to accept the office of National President of the Society in Australia, Mills resided there for three years. Returning to her home in Ojai, CA, Mills continues to teach at the Krotona School and also serves on the Board of Trustees of the Krotona Institute. Mills continues as a member of the international society's General Council, its governing body, and has made frequent trips to its Indian headquarters. Now in semi-retirement, she devotes most of her time to writing while still presenting some classes at Krotona.

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