101 Poems That Could Save Your Life: An Anthology of Emotional First Aid

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Harper Collins, Nov 23, 2010 - Poetry - 160 pages
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Prozac has side effects, drinking gives you hangovers, therapy's expensive. For quick and effective relief -- or at least some literary comfort -- from everyday and exceptional problems, try a poem. Over the ages, people have turned to poets as ambassadors of the emotions, because they give voice and definition to our troubles, and by so doing, ease them. No matter how bad things get, poets have been there, too, and they can help you get over the rough spots.

This is the first poetry anthology designed expressly for the self-help generation. The poems listed include classics by Emily Dickinson, Lord Byron, Ogden Nash, and Lucretius, to name just a few, along with newer works by such current practitioners as Seamus Heaney and Wendy Cope. This book has a cure or consolation for nearly every affliction, ancient or modern. And no side effects-except pleasure.

 

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User Review  - 912greens - LibraryThing

I think there were only about 5 poems here that could actually save my life in a pinch, while considerably more of them might drive me to despair. A misleading title, perhaps, but an interesting admixture of the beautiful with the bad. Read full review

Contents

Apologies
3
Big decision
10
Christmas
19
Divorce
28
Famous for fifteen minutes
39
Football widow
46
Hangovers
52
Is this relationship going
65
Just do it
75
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
139
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About the author (2010)

Daisy Goodwin attended Cambridge University and then won a Harkness Scholarshipto Columbia University. She is now a producer of top-rated television programs for the BBC, including the Nation's Favourite series. In addition to Essential Poems (To Fall in Love With), she has edited two other bestselling collections, 101 Poems That Could Save Your Life and 101 Poems to Get You Through the Day (and Night). She lives in London with her husband and two children.

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