101 Tips on Writing and Selling Your First Novel

Front Cover
iUniverse, Sep 1, 2003 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 174 pages
0 Reviews
"101 Tips on Writing and Selling Your First Novel takes you from the baby steps of getting organized to full-blown marketing with well-written, well-organized, information-packed pages that have even the 'greenest' of writers submitting a professional and polished manuscript for publication. Ms. Taylor's readers will be empowered with confidence, having the knowledge that all their bases are covered when submitting their first, and subsequent, novels for publication."
-Ingrid Taylor, Small Press Review

"As a novice writer, you must have a good grasp of the basics, and now it's here! Not only will 101 TIPS show you how to write, but once your book is ready, how to sell. Allow yourself to be one of the very small percentage of writers who approach agents, editors, and publishers, in a professional manner, with your work ready to be seen!"
-Babs Lakey, Publisher, Futures Mysterious Anthology Magazine, www.fmam.biz

"For years I have been struggling with a novel in progress. Prudy Taylor Board's worksheet pages, calendars, making the characters alive and functioning, have all helped me see my novel as a living, moving, productive vehicle. Every writer should have this book and every workshop facilitator should use it as a textbook. It is the most complete "trip ticket" for writers I have come across in 40 years of writing."
-Virginia B. Elliott, Naples, Florida
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

GETTING READY TO WRITE
1
Tip 2 First steps
7
Tip 9 Time must march onmake your own calendar
13
PENCIL SHARPENER
22
Tip 15 Bulk up your novel with dramatic muscle
29
Tip 17 Are you an author in search of a plotting shed?
31
Tip 19 Games people playdouble dealing deception and secrets are vital to your plot
32
Tip 21 Books about plotting books
33
Tip 58 A dash of accent goes a long way
122
PENCIL SHARPENER
128
ITS EASIER SEEN IN A SCENE
129
Tip 61 Each scene has a beginning middle and endan internal structure
130
Tip 63 Being unpredictable contributes to being readable but
131
Tip 65 Writing sensibly sensitively sensually
132
GETTING AHEAD IN TIME AND PLACE AKA TRANSITION AND EXPOSITION
134
Tip 66 In the beginning of most chapters there was exposition
135

PEOPLING YOUR PAGES
35
Tip 22 Create and maintain your cast of characters
43
Tip 23 Foibles failures and flaws are the writers friendswriting description
44
Tip 25 Travel with a camera
45
Tip 27 Whats good for baby is good for the writer
46
Tip 30 When should you use characters from real life?
47
Tip 31 Applying for the job of one of your characters
48
Tip 33 Even Adolph Hitler liked animals
49
Tip 35 Why not create a family of characters?
50
FILLINTHE BLANK JOB CHARACTER APPLICATIONS
51
PENCIL SHARPENER
85
POINT OF VIEW IS MUCH MORE THAN AN EXPRESSION OF OPINION
86
Tip 36 But how do you select a POV character? Audition them
87
Tip 37 First person shouldnt necessarily be first choice
88
Tip 38 Maybe your heros best friend should be a blabbermouth
89
Tip 40 Each viewpoint character has a different point of view
90
Tip 41 Shiftily shifting viewpoint characters
91
PLACES AND SETTINGS ARE NOT THE SAME AS PLACE SETTINGS
93
Tip 42 Get em out of the house and the office
102
Tip 44 Dont dump description in clumps
103
Tip 46 Whats real what isnt? Using fictional locations in real towns
104
Tip 48 Being a writer means vacations will never be the same
105
PENCIL SHARPENER
114
DIALOGUE IS MORE THAN PEOPLE TALKING
117
Tip 49 Dialogue is more than straight talk
118
Tip 52 The voice in your characters mindinternal dialogue
119
Tip 54 Eavesdropping is key to writing successful dialogue
120
Tip 56 How do you indicate thoughts?
121
Tip 68 Atrigger is not merely part of a gun
136
FINAL WRITES AND OTHER ET CETERA
138
Tip 69 Does your title tell the real story?
139
Tip 72 Check for gonowhere scenes too
140
Tip 74 Last chance checklist
141
TO MARKET TO MARKET
143
Tip 76 Simultaneous submissions are not always taboo
144
Tip 77 Give the editors what they want
145
Tip 79 Two little words that make a big difference
146
Tip 81 A synopsis is
147
Tip 82 An outline is
152
Tip 84 Once the publisher sends the contract
153
Tip 85 Getting an agent isnt impossible it just seems that way
154
Tip 86 What an agent can and can not do for you
155
Tip 87 Whats a POD?
156
Tip 88 Whats an ebook?
157
Tip 89 The appearance of the manuscript does make a difference
158
Tip 91 How long should you wait to hear from a publisher or an agent?
159
SAMPLE COVER SHEET
161
SAMPLE MANUSCRIPT PAGE
162
SURVIVAL TECHNIQUES
164
Tip 94 Handy reference books to have in your writing library
165
Tip 95 Magazines you should read andor subscribe to if you can afford them If not check out your local library
166
Tip 96 Writers organizations worth exploring
167
Tip 97 Start your own writing textbook
168
Tip 98 Learn from every mistake every rejection
169
Tip 100 Handling rejection without giving
170
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2003)

Prudy Taylor Board is a native Floridian and an award-winning author/editor with more than a thousand articles published in newspapers and magazines. She is the author of sixteen books and has been a reporter/feature writer and has edited newspapers, magazines and newsletters.

Bibliographic information