103 Great Poems: A Dual-language Book

Front Cover
Courier Corporation, 1999 - Poetry - 237 pages
1 Review
Exceptionally fine poetry by Germany's greatest literary figure spans a wide range of styles, forms and moods, offering a rich selection of the poet's verse — from his earliest, "An den Schlaf" ("To Sleep"), written when he was 18, to his last great poem, "Verdauml;chtnis" ("Legacy"), written when he was 80.
 

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Review: 103 Great Poems: A Dual-Language Book

User Review  - Thefridayinfluence - Goodreads

First off: the two stars are more for the translation than Goethe's actual writing. And I'm not a translation snob: Mr Applebaum did a fine job for his purposes. I enjoyed reading his Goethe and ... Read full review

Contents

I
vii
II
3
IV
5
VI
7
VII
9
VIII
11
IX
13
X
19
LIX
107
LXI
111
LXII
121
LXIII
127
LXIV
133
LXV
135
LXVII
139
LXVIII
141

XI
21
XII
25
XIV
29
XVI
31
XVII
35
XVIII
37
XIX
39
XX
41
XXI
43
XXIII
45
XXVI
49
XXIX
53
XXX
57
XXXI
59
XXXII
61
XXXIII
63
XXXIV
67
XXXVI
69
XXXVII
73
XXXIX
77
XLI
85
XLIV
87
XLVI
91
XLVII
93
XLIX
95
L
97
LII
99
LIII
101
LVI
103
LVIII
105
LXIX
147
LXX
149
LXXI
153
LXXII
155
LXXIII
157
LXXIV
159
LXXV
161
LXXVI
167
LXXVII
169
LXXVIII
171
LXXX
173
LXXXI
175
LXXXIII
181
LXXXIV
183
LXXXVI
185
LXXXVIII
187
LXXXIX
189
XCI
191
XCII
193
XCIII
195
XCIV
197
XCV
207
XCVII
215
XCVIII
219
XCIX
221
C
223
CII
225
CIV
227
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About the author (1999)

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, 1749-1832 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was born in Frankfurt am Main. He was greatly influenced by his mother, who encouraged his literary aspirations. After troubles at school, he was taught at home and gained an exceptionally wide education. At the age of 16, Goethe began to study law at Leipzig University from 1765 to 1768, and he also studied drawing with Adam Oeser. After a period of illness, he resumed his studies in Strasbourg from 1770 to 1771. Goethe practiced law in Frankfurt for two years and in Wetzlar for a year. He contributed to the Frankfurter Gelehrte Anzeigen from 1772 to 1773, and in 1774 he published his first novel, self-revelatory Die Leiden des Jungen Werthers. In 1775 he was welcomed by Duke Karl August into the small court of Weimar, where he worked in several governmental offices. He was a council member and member of the war commission, director of roads and services, and managed the financial affairs of the court. Goethe was released from day-to-day governmental duties to concentrate on writing, although he was still general supervisor for arts and sciences, and director of the court theatres. In the 1790s Goethe contributed to Friedrich von Schiller ́s journal Die Horen, published Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship, and continued his writings on the ideals of arts and literature in his own journal, Propyläen. The first part of his masterwork, Faust, appeared in 1808, and the second part in 1832. Goethe had worked for most of his life on this drama, and was based on Christopher Marlowe's Faust. From 1791 to 1817, Goethe was the director of the court theatres. He advised Duke Carl August on mining and Jena University, which for a short time attracted the most prominent figures in German philosophy. He edited Kunst and Altertum and Zur Naturwissenschaft. Goethe died in Weimar on March 22, 1832. He and Duke Schiller are buried together, in a mausoleum in the ducal cemetery.

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