13 Carat Diamond and Other Stories

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Parami Bookshop, Jan 1, 2005 - Short stories, Burmese - 128 pages
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The collection of stories and sketches giving the readers entertainment, pleasure, glimpses of the authorÔs life, as well as information on Myanmar Culture which she is so proud of.
 

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one of the most talented authors from Burma.

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The 13-Carat Diamond
A story
By Daw Khin Myo Chit
Translated by H. Conar
It was during the dark days of the Japanese occupation in Burma. We had been married only two years and we were beginning to settle down. Ko Latt had a nice job, but our dreams of a bright and happy future were shattered by the war. We found ourselves without a home, without jobs, in fact without anything except a mischievous toddler who was always hungry-. We were lost in the great maze of wartime life.
At that time many people who had never been in business before turned petty traders and seemed to do well. Some kind friends tried to help us by giving us goods to be sold on a commission basis. Easy money, no doubt. It seemed like child's play. But look what happened. A customer would come to our roadside stall and go over our wares with critical eye as if she would not take them even if we gave them away for nothing. With a look of contempt she would ask, "How much are you asking for this laundry soap?"
"Five cakes for one kyat."
"What a price! Let's see, how about giving me six for one kyat, ten pyas?"
It made my head swim. I pressed the mental accelerator but it refused to budge. I blushed and stammered, "Yes." If I sold at a loss, I couldn't help it. Even then my troubles were not over. The customer went on bargaining.
"What about five for eighty pyas?"
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"Yes, yes, take them, take as many as you like!" and I added a few strong words under my breath.
Our business career seemed to be made up entirely of similar scenes. Let me not go into humiliating details. Suffice it to say that we got into all sorts of scrapes. Our wares were pinched. The day's figures would not add up right. Only our son enjoyed the fun. He took the rags used for packing, wrapped himself up in them and ran along the pavement dancing with glee. We had to laugh at the little rascal in spite of ourselves.
It is easy enough for people who are well off to sing of poverty, love in a hut, and so on. We who have gone through it have no sentimental illusions. "The worm in the ground knows every tooth of the harrow. The butterfly above preaches patience." Poverty, to say the least, is very uncomfortable.
After a while we managed to get employment in one of the government offices. By that time Allied air raids had begun and we had to shift from one place to another, losing some of our few belongings with every move. At last we settled down in a ramshackle shed in the suburbs. It was close to our office building so I could work and still keep tabs on our son at home. When the air-raid sirens sounded, I would rush home and take him to a safe shelter.
In spite of the raids, we were happier because we were no longer unemployed. We had the dignity of being government servants although our joint salaries barely paid for the daily necessities. It was difficult to believe that we had to live on the edge of starvation. Could such things really happen in Burma, a land flowing with milk and honey?
We had rice, but cooking oil, a product of Upper Burma, could not be secured. It became so scarce that we had to be content with animal fat. How I hated that abominable grease floating on my curries! After passing through stages of impotent fury, rebellion, and frustration, I resigned myself and invented various ways of cooking eatable dishes with leaves of sweet potato and roselle. Ko Latt was wonderful. He took things like a philosopher. When we sat down to meals, he would look at the steaming dishes and say, "Yum yum, it smells delicious." He always had something nice to say about my cooking. This braced me up and I went on creating masterpieces.
As for clothes—bed sheets, tablecloths, and even curtains had to be made into something to wear. Our son had his shirts made from old napkins.
The war raged on and things went from bad to worse. Japanese paper money flew like dead leaves--only it did not fly our way. Yet petty traders
 

Contents

Preface
4
The 13Carat Diamond
7
HomeComing
20
The Golden Princess
28
Electra Triumphs
36
The Ruse
46
The Bearer Of The Betel Casket
56
The Egg And I
67
Sweet Airs That Give Delight
84
FortuneTelling Is Fun
89
The Late Princess Mindat
97
Why Writers Write
103
A Writers Prayer
108
The Man Who Twirls His Beard
113
Chit Pe The Lunatic And Money
116
Till The Hair Rots And Falls To The Ground
119

Believe In Miracles
73
Of Mice And Men
78

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