140 Characters: A Style Guide for the Short Form

Front Cover
John Wiley & Sons, Sep 24, 2009 - Business & Economics - 208 pages
Make the most of your messages on Twitter, Facebook, and other social networking sites

The advent of Twitter and other social networking sites, as well as the popularity of text messaging, have made short-form communication an everyday reality. But expressing yourself clearly in short bursts-particularly in the 140-character limit of Twitter-takes special writing skill.

In 140 Characters, Twitter co-creator Dom Sagolla covers all the basics of great short-form writing, including the importance of communicating with simplicity, honesty, and humor. For marketers and business owners, social media is an increasingly important avenue for promoting a business-this is the first writing guide specifically dedicated to communicating with the succinctness and clarity that the Internet age demands.

  • Covers basic grammar rules for short-form writing
  • The equivalent of Strunk and White's Elements of Style for today's social media-driven marketing messages
  • Helps you develop your own unique short-form writing style

140 Characters is a much-needed guide to the kind of communication that can make or break a reputation online.

 

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Contents

LEAD
1
A Brief Digression to Discuss
7
Say More with Less
15
Dont Become a Fable about
23
Say It Out Loud
39
Understand Your Audience
46
It Worked for Shakespeare
53
Search for Silence Volume
64
Apply Multiple Techniques
101
Meet 140 Characters
110
EVOLVE
123
Teach the Machine
129
Give and You Shall Receive
135
Practice a Sequence
144
Do More
153
Recommended Reading
161

Deduce the Nature
70
Expose the Possibilities
74
MASTER
95

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About the author (2009)

DOM SAGOLLA helped create Twitter with Jack Dorsey and a team of entrepreneurs in San Francisco. He also helped engineer Macromedia Studio, Odeo, and Adobe Creative Suite, and now produces iPhone applications with his company, DollarApp.

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