17 Morton Street

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Thorndike Press, 1990 - Fiction - 393 pages
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A fast-moving and sometimes very funny story of three loving sisters who have separate lives but live together in one house, each in her own apartment. The story is divided into three parts: Sara, Perri, and Lucy. Two of the sisters are beautiful, the third one is not. Into their lives comes Carlo, a handsome Italian male au pair, hired to help out with Sara's children.

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17 Morton Street

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A fast-moving and sometimes very funny story of three loving sisters who have separate lives but live together in one house, each in her own apartment. The story is divided into three parts: Sara ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
7
Section 2
13
Section 3
27
Copyright

42 other sections not shown

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About the author (1990)

Catherine Hiller began writing in a diary when she was ten and now has dozens of spiral-bound journals, which she never rereads. She grew up in Greenwich Village and Brooklyn, and was educated at Brooklyn College, Sussex University and Brown University, where she received a Ph.D. in English. Her first published piece, about gender role reversal in The Way We Were, appeared in the New York Times. Soon after, she published two books for children: Argentaybee and the Boonie and Abracatabby. Three novels for adults followed, often about unconventional love: An Old Friend from High School, 17 Morton Street and California Time. Catherine then became interested in documentary film making and co-produced/co-directed Do Not Enter: The Visa War Against Ideas. Exploring the difficulties faced by politically leftwing visitors to the USA, such as Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Carlos Fuentes, and Dario Fo, the film aired on PBS, was shown to members of Congress and received a Blue Ribbon. She also co-produced and co-directed Paul Bowles: The Complete Outsider, a film portrait of the American author (The Sheltering Sky) and composer, which premiered at the Museum of Modern Art. Catherine's next books returned to the subject of passion. Her story collection, Skin: Sensual Tales was praised by John Updike, who wrote "Catherine Hiller writes with a fine directness and clarity . . . Good, brave, and joyful writing." This was followed by Cybill In Between. In stark contrast in terms of subject and audience, her most recent novel is The Adventures of Sid Sawyer, published initially as an ebook by Armadillo Central. This is Mark Twain's Adventures of Tom Sawyer turned upside down. Told from the point of view of Tom's geeky half-brother Sid, we get a whole new angle on a beloved classic.

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