Writings of Charles S. Peirce: 1857-1866

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Indiana University Press, 1982 - Mathematics - 698 pages
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Volume 8 of this landmark edition follows Peirce from May 1890 through July 1892 -- a period of turmoil as his career unraveled at the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. The loss of his principal source of income meant the beginning of permanent penury and a lifelong struggle to find gainful employment. His key achievement during these years is his celebrated Monist metaphysical project, which consists of five classic articles on evolutionary cosmology. Also included are reviews and essays from The Nation in.
 

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Contents

Preface
xiii
Chronology
xix
Bibliographical Abbreviations in Editorial Matter
xxiii
Introduction
xxv
Boolian AlgebraElementary Explanations
1
CORRESPONDENCE COURSE ON THE ART OF REASONING
9
Circular for Course on the Art of Reasoning
10
Followup Letter to Circular
15
Chapter I Trichotomy
168
Chapter III The Triad in Metaphysics
181
Chapter IV The Triad in Psychology
182
Chapter V The Triad in Physiology
188
Chapter VI The Triad in Biological Development
199
Chapter VII The Triad in Physics
203
Trichotomic
211
Pendulum Observations at Fort Conger
216

A Few Specimens of Exercises in the Art of Rea soning
19
Directions to Agents
21
Letter to New Students
33
Orientation Letter to Marie Noble
35
Letter to Noble on the Nature of Reasoning
37
Number Series Relational Graphs and Card Games
41
Boolian Algebra Three Lessons
50
Two Letters from J B Loring on Algebra Lessons
54
Reply to Loring
56
Additional Exercises in Boolian Algebra
58
Science and Immortality
61
Logical Machines
65
THE PEIRCEGURNEY DISPUTE OVER
73
An Exami nation of an Argument of Messrs Gurney Myers and Podmore
74
Remarks on Professor Peirces Paper by E Gurney
82
Mr Peirces Rejoinder
101
Remarks on Mr Peirces Rejoinder by E Gumey
142
Number
155
Logic of Number
156
A GUESS AT THE RIDDLE
165
Contents
166
Reflections on the Logic of Science
246
Note on the Analytical Representation of Space as a Section of a Higher Dimensional Space
260
Ordinal Geometry
263
Mathematical Monads
268
Review of Stock s Deductive Logic
271
Report on Gravity at the Smithsonian Ann Arbor Madison and Cornell
275
Reasoning
354
On a Geometrical Notation
357
On the Numbers of Forms of Sets
360
The Formal Classification of Relations
363
Notes on Geometry of Plane Curves without
372
Logic and Spiritualism
380
Herbert Spencers Philosophy
395
Review of Collins s Epitome of the Synthetic Phi
401
Editorial Symbols
413
Bibliography ofPeirces References
506
Chronological Catalog January 1887April 1890
512
Supplement to W5 Chronological List 18841886
531
Textual Apparatus
557
LineEnd Hyphenation in the Edition Text
672
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About the author (1982)

Charles Sanders Peirce was the son of the eminent mathematician and Harvard professor Benjamin Peirce. The young Peirce attended Harvard University, where he studied science, mathematics, and philosophy. For 30 years he worked for the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. Because of personal difficulties---he was overbearing and eccentric---he taught only briefly as a lecturer at Harvard (1864-65, 1869-71) and at Johns Hopkins University (1879--84). He wrote no books and published very little during his lifetime, mostly articles and encyclopedia entries, but many collections of his articles and unpublished papers have appeared. Peirce was a brilliant logician and creative metaphysician. His papers, many published long after his death, are of great importance in the philosophical literature.

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