The Correspondence of Charles Darwin:, Volume 11; Volume 1863

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Sep 16, 1999 - Biography & Autobiography - 1086 pages
0 Reviews
This volume includes many letters not previously published, and chronicles a year that was enlivened by scientific controversy and filled with scientific queries and discussions relating to Darwin's transmutation theory. His love of botany and his expanding experimental programme is well depicted by correspondence with professional botanists, horticulturalists, and hobbyists. Nine appendixes complement the letters by providing additional information from the Darwin Archive and from nineteenth-century publications. The letters also provide glimpses of life among the Victorian gentry, and reveal the practical and emotional support Darwin received from his family.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

List of Letters
ix
Introduction
xv
Acknowledgments
xxix
List of Provenances
xxxii
Note on Editorial Policy
xxxiv
DarwinWedgwood genealogy
xl
Abbreviations and symbols
xlii
THE CORRESPONDENCE 1863
1
Donald Beatons responses to Charles Darwins letters to the Journal of Horticulture
729
Darwins lists of hothouse plants
741
Notices in the Athenœum on William Benjamin Carpenters Introduction to the study of Foraminifera and the origin of species
754
The squib on scientific controversies
769
An appeal
776
Manuscript Alterations and Comments
782
Biographical Register and index to correspondents
794
Bibliography
881

Translations
699
Chronology
713
Diploma presented to Charles Darwin
716
Presentation list for Two forms in species of Linum
718
Notes On Manuscript Sources
949
Index
953
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1999)

Charles Robert Darwin, born in 1809, was an English naturalist who founded the theory of Darwinism, the belief in evolution as determined by natural selection. Although Darwin studied medicine at Edinburgh University, and then studied at Cambridge University to become a minister, he had been interested in natural history all his life. His grandfather, Erasmus Darwin, was a noted English poet, physician, and botanist who was interested in evolutionary development. Darwin's works have had an incalculable effect on all aspects of the modern thought. Darwin's most famous and influential work, On the Origin of Species, provoked immediate controversy. Darwin's other books include Zoology of the Voyage of the Beagle, The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication, The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex. Charles Darwin died in 1882.

James A. Secord has served as Director of the Darwin Correspondence Project since 2006. He is Professor of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge and a fellow of Christ's College. Besides his work for the Darwin Project, his research focuses on the history of science from the late eighteenth to the early twentieth centuries. His book, Victorian Sensation: The Extraordinary Publication, Reception, and Secret Authorship of Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation (2000), won the Pfizer Prize of the History of Science Society.

Jonathan Topham is Senior Research Fellow on the 'Science in the Nineteenth-Century Periodical' (SciPer) Project at the Universities of Sheffield and Leeds. He has published widely on scientific publishing and the readership for science in nineteenth-century Britain and is co-editor of Culture and Science in the Nineteenth-Century Media (2004).

Bibliographic information