1867: How the Fathers Made a Deal

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McClelland & Stewart, 1997 - History - 279 pages
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"In the 1860s, western alienation began at Yonge Street, and George Brown was the Preston Manning of the day." So begins Christopher Moore's fascinating 1990s look at the messy, dramatic, crisis-ridden process that brought Canada into being - and at the politicians, no more lovable or united than our own, who, against all odds, managed to forge a deal that worked.
From the first chapter, he turns a fresh, perceptive, and lucid eye on the people, the issues, and the political theories of Confederation - from John A. Macdonald's canny handling of leadership to the invention of federalism and the Senate, from the Quebec question to the influence of political philosophers Edmund Burke and Walter Bagehot.
This is a book for all Canadians who love their country - and fear for it after the failure of the constitution-making of the 1990s. Here is a clear, entertaining reintroduction to the ideas and processes that forged the nation.

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User Review  - LynnB - LibraryThing

Christopher Moore writes about the confederation debates in the 1860s, and relates them to the constitutional conferences of the 1980s and 1990s. He explains the context in which the "fathers [of ... Read full review

Contents

Charles Tupper Goes to Charlottetown
32
Ned Whelan and Edmund Burke
64
Under the Confederation Windows
95
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Christopher Moore may be Canada’s most versatile writer of history. His first book, Louisbourg Portraits, won a Governor General’s Award and continues to delight readers, and his Loyalists: Revolution, Exile, Settlement won the Secretary of State’s Prize for Excellence in Canadian Studies. He co-authored the authoritative Illustrated History of Canada, and his history of Canada for young people, The Story of Canada (co-authored with Janet Lunn), was a bestseller and won the Mister Christie Award for Children’s Books. He has also written The Law Society of Upper Canada and Ontario’s Lawyers, Canada: Our Country (co-authored with Mark Kingwell), and 1867: How the Fathers Made a Deal. H

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