Booker T. Washington Papers Volume 5: 1899-1900. Assistant Editor, Barbara S. Kraft

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University of Illinois Press, 1976 - Social Science - 784 pages
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The memoirs and accounts of the Black educator are presented with letters, speeches, personal documents, and other writings reflecting his life and career
 

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Contents

Jan 1899 From Timothy Thomas Fortune
3
Jan 1899 From Edward Henry Clement
5
Jan 1899 To Frank E Saffold
6
Jan 1899 To Emmett Jay Scott
7
Jan 1899 An Endowment Campaign Pamphlet
8
Jan 1899 From Edgar Webber
11
Jan 1899 From Charles G Harris
12
Jan 1899 From George Washington Henderson
16
June 1899 From Joseph Forney Johnston
141
American
164
Aug 1899 To Jabez Lamar Monroe Curry
171
Aug 1899 An Interview in the New York Times
178
Aug 1899 From Timothy Thomas Fortune
185
Aug 1899 From Timothy Thomas Fortune
193
Sept 1899 To Timothy Thomas Fortune
203
ca g Oct 1899 To William H Breed
228

Jan 1899 From George H McDaniel
17
Jan 1899 From Timothy Thomas Fortune
18
Jan 1899 From Warren Logan
19
Jan 1899 From Julius Daniel Dreher
21
A Circular of the Tuskegee Negro Conference
23
Feb 1899 From Timothy Thomas Fortune
24
Feb 1899 From Emmett Jay Scott
25
Feb 1899 From Isabel Hayes Chapin Barrows
26
Feb 1899 From William Farrington Aldrich
28
Feb 1899 From Mary Caroline Moore
29
Feb 1899 From Henry Bradley Plant 3o 13 Feb 1899 From George Washington Carver
31
Feb 1899 An Abraham Lincoln Memorial Address in Philadelphia
32
Feb 1899 To Henry Bradley Plant
38
Feb 1899 From William Jonathan Northen
40
Feb 1899 From Viola Knapp Ruffner
46
Mar 1899 Extracts from an Address at the Hollis
54
Mar 1899 From the Diary of Helen Tufts Bailie
60
Mar 1899 From Francis Jackson Garrison
67
P Bancroft
76
World
83
Apr 1899 To Walter Hines Page
88
Apr 1899 From Roger Nash Baldwin
95
May 1899 From William H Hurt
111
May 1899 To the Editor of the Indianapolis Freeman
117
June 1899 Emmett Jay Scott to William EHsha King
135
Nov 1899 To Timothy Thomas Fortune
260
Nov 1899 To Timothy Thomas Fortune
266
Nov 1899 From Francis Jackson Garrison
272
Jan 1900 To Emily Rowland
411
Jan 1900 From Walter Hines Page
417
Jan 1900 An Article in the Denver Post
423
Feb 1900 From Joseph Eugene Ransdell
437
Feb 1900 From William Edward Burghardt Du Bois
443
Feb 1900 An Item in the Washington Colored American
448
Mar 1900 From Hollis Burke Frissell
454
Mar 1900 To Timothy Thomas Fortune
460
Mar 1900 From William A Pledger
466
Mar 1900 From Richard W Thompson
473
Apr 1900 To Francis Jackson Garrison
490
May 1900 To the Editor of the Washington Colored
496
July 1900 From Emmett Jay Scott
591
Oct 1900 To Lyman Abbott
653
ca Oct 1900 A Statement on Southern Politics
662
Nov 1900 To Emmett Jay Scott
672
Nov 1900 From Allen Ralph Griggs
673
Nov 1900 From Alice Bradford Wiles
679
Nov 1900 From William Henry Baldwin Jr
685
BIBLIOGRAPHY
711
INDEX
717
Copyright

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About the author (1976)

Booker Taliaferro Washington, 1856 - 1915 Booker T. Washington was born a slave in Hales Ford, Virginia, near Roanoke. After the U.S. government freed all slaves in 1865, his family moved to Malden, West Virginia. There, Washington worked in coal mines and salt furnaces. He went on to attend the Hampton, Virginia Normal and Agricultural Institute from 1872-1875 before joining the staff in 1879. In 1881 he was selected to head the Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute, a new teacher-training school for blacks, which he transformed into a thriving institution, later named Tuskegee University. His controversial conviction that blacks could best gain equality in the U.S. by improving their economic situation through education rather than by demanding equal rights was termed the Atlanta Compromise, because Washington accepted inequality and segregation for blacks in exchange for economic advancement. Washington advised two Presidents, Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft, on racial problems and policies, as well as influencing the appointment of several blacks to federal offices. Washington became a shrewd political leader and advised not only Presidents, but also members of Congress and governors. He urged wealthy people to contribute to various black organizations. He also owned or financially supported many black newspapers. In 1900, Washington founded the National Negro Business League to help black business firms. Washington fought silently for equal rights, but was eventually usurped by those who ideas were more radical and demanded more action. Washington was replaced by W. E. B. Du Bois as the foremost black leader of the time, after having spent long years listening to Du Bois deride him for his placation of the white man and the plight of the negro. He died in 1915.

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