Booker T. Washington Papers Volume 8: 1904-6. Assistant Editor, Geraldine McTigue

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University of Illinois Press, Jul 1, 1979 - Social Science - 828 pages
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The memoirs and accounts of the Black educator are presented with letters, speeches, personal documents, and other writings reflecting his life and career.
 

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Contents

July 1904 To Theodore Roosevelt
6
July 1904 To William H Steward
12
July 1904 To Emmett Jay Scott
18
July 1904 To the Editor of the Birmingham Ledger
20
July 1904 To George Bruce Cortelyou
26
Gordon
32
Aug 1904 To Austin N Jenkins
45
Aug 1904 From Theodore Roosevelt
51
Mar 1905 To Emmett Jay Scott
242
Apr 1905 To John Stephens Durham
253
ca 2o Apr 1905 Emmett Jay Scotts Summary of Confessions
264
Powell Poindexter Smith Ocie Romeo
288
May 1905 To Ellis Paxson Oberholtzer
293
June 1905 To Samuel Laing Williams
300
June 1905 To Elbert B Williams
318
July 1905 Samuel Laing Williams to Emmett Jay Scott
324

Aug 1904 To Sumner Alexander Furniss
57
Sept 1904 To Julius Robert Cox
65
Oct 1904 To Oswald Garrison Villard
91
Oct 1904 An Item in the New York World
105
Oct 1904 To the Archbishop of Canterbury
118
Oct 1904 From Emmett Jay Scott
119
Emmett Jay Scott
130
Nov 1904 To Portia Marshall Washington
137
Nov 1904 To Timothy Thomas Fortune
145
Dec 1904 From Roscoe Conkling Simmons
154
Dec 1904 To John Stephens Durham
160
Dec 1904 To Theodore Roosevelt
166
From George Foster Peabody
177
Jan 1905 From Charles Alexander
183
Feb 1905 Emmett Jay Scott to Roscoe Conkling
194
Feb 1905 From Charles Alexander
200
ca Feb 1905 Emmett Jay Scott to Frederick Randolph
206
Mar 1905 A Draft of an Editorial
213
Mar 1905 From Emmett Jay Scott
219
July 1905 From Emmett Jay Scott
330
Aug 1905 From Fannie Barrier Williams
341
Aug 1905 To Benjamin Jefferson Davis
347
Sept 1905 From John Wesley Edward Bowen
354
Sept 1905 To Seth Low
360
Sept 1905 To J Douglas Wetmore
368
Sept 1905 From Charles William Anderson
374
Sept 1905 To Charles William Anderson
380
ca 2oOct 1905 To Napoleon Bonaparte Marshall
416
Nov 1905 To Wilford H Smith
448
Dec 1905 From Pinckney Benton Stewart Pinchback
463
Dec 1905 From Charles William Anderson
469
The Tenth Annual Report of the Tuskcgee
475
Jan 1906 To Francis Jackson Garrison
491
Jan 1906 From Ralph Waldo Tyler
502
Laing Williams
515
Mar 1906 To Roscoe Conkling Bruce
559
BIBLIOGRAPHY
589
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About the author (1979)

Booker Taliaferro Washington, 1856 - 1915 Booker T. Washington was born a slave in Hales Ford, Virginia, near Roanoke. After the U.S. government freed all slaves in 1865, his family moved to Malden, West Virginia. There, Washington worked in coal mines and salt furnaces. He went on to attend the Hampton, Virginia Normal and Agricultural Institute from 1872-1875 before joining the staff in 1879. In 1881 he was selected to head the Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute, a new teacher-training school for blacks, which he transformed into a thriving institution, later named Tuskegee University. His controversial conviction that blacks could best gain equality in the U.S. by improving their economic situation through education rather than by demanding equal rights was termed the Atlanta Compromise, because Washington accepted inequality and segregation for blacks in exchange for economic advancement. Washington advised two Presidents, Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft, on racial problems and policies, as well as influencing the appointment of several blacks to federal offices. Washington became a shrewd political leader and advised not only Presidents, but also members of Congress and governors. He urged wealthy people to contribute to various black organizations. He also owned or financially supported many black newspapers. In 1900, Washington founded the National Negro Business League to help black business firms. Washington fought silently for equal rights, but was eventually usurped by those who ideas were more radical and demanded more action. Washington was replaced by W. E. B. Du Bois as the foremost black leader of the time, after having spent long years listening to Du Bois deride him for his placation of the white man and the plight of the negro. He died in 1915.

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